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Latest Junichiro Kono Stories

graphene
2014-08-15 03:39:57

Mike Williams, Rice University Rice, Osaka scientists use terahertz waves to spot contaminants Graphene may be tough, but those who handle it had better be tender. The environment surrounding the atom-thick carbon material can influence its electronic performance, according to researchers at Rice and Osaka universities who have come up with a simple way to spot contaminants. Because it's so easy to accidently introduce impurities into graphene, labs led by physicists Junichiro Kono...

2012-01-31 09:07:58

Terahertz polarizer nears perfection Researchers at Rice University are using carbon nanotubes as the critical component of a robust terahertz polarizer that could accelerate the development of new security and communication devices, sensors and non-invasive medical imaging systems as well as fundamental studies of low-dimensional condensed matter systems. The polarizer developed by the Rice lab of Junichiro Kono, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of physics and...

2012-01-31 06:17:48

Rice University researchers first to see superfluorescence from solid-state material In a flash, the world changed for Tim Noe — and for physicists who study what they call many-body problems. The Rice University graduate student was the first to see, in the summer of 2010, proof of a theory that solid-state materials are capable of producing an effect known as superfluorescence. That can only happen when "many bodies" — in this case, electron-hole pairs created in a...

2012-01-09 19:45:20

Rice University researchers tag excitons in search for hues' clues Rice University researchers have figured out what gives armchair nanotubes their unique bright colors: hydrogen-like objects called excitons. Their findings appear in the online edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Armchair carbon nanotubes — so named for the "U"-shaped configuration of the atoms at their uncapped tips — are one-dimensional metals and have no band gap. This means...

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2010-07-08 14:33:06

Metallic carbon nanotubes show great promise for applications from microelectronics to power lines because of their ballistic transmission of electrons. But who knew magnets could stop those electrons in their tracks? Rice physicist Junichiro Kono and his team have been studying the Aharonov-Bohm effect -- the interaction between electrically charged particles and magnetic fields -- and how it relates to carbon nanotubes.  While doing so, they came to the unexpected conclusion that...

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2010-05-10 11:19:44

Rice researchers spin pure batches of nanotubes species In two new papers, Rice University researchers report using ultracentrifugation (UCF) to create highly purified samples of carbon nanotube species. One team, led by Rice Professor Junichiro Kono and graduate students Erik Haroz and William Rice, has made a small but significant step toward the dream of an efficient nationwide electrical grid that depends on highly conductive quantum nanowire. The other, led by Rice Professor Bruce...

2009-12-07 18:42:42

Rice lab makes solid material transparent to terahertz waves Very often in science, the unexpected discovery turns out to be the most significant. Rice University Professor Junichiro Kono and his team weren't looking for a breakthrough in the transmission of terahertz signals, but there it was: a plasmonic material that would, with adjustments to its temperature and/or magnetic field, either stop a terahertz beam cold or let it pass completely. The finding by Kono, a professor in electrical...


Word of the Day
cenobite
  • One of a religious order living in a convent or in community; a monk: opposed to anchoret or hermit (one who lives in solitude).
  • A social bee.
This word comes from the Latin 'coenobium,' convent, which comes from the Greek 'koinobios,' living in community.
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