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Latest Junior Myoclonic Epilepsy Stories

2012-06-06 12:22:39

Seizure severity and antiepileptic drug polytherapy among predictors of poor seizure outcomes A 25-year follow-up study reveals that 68% of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) became seizure-free, with nearly 30% no longer needing antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Findings published today in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), report that the occurrence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures preceded by bilateral myoclonic seizures, and AED...

2012-05-23 19:23:59

Researchers link seizure resistance to a protein that modifies cellular metabolism in the brain For decades, neurologists have known that a diet high in fat and extremely low in carbohydrates can reduce epileptic seizures that resist drug therapy. But how the diet worked, and why, was a mystery–so much so that in 2010, The New York Times Magazine called it "Epilepsy's Big, Fat Miracle." Now, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School have proposed an...

2012-05-10 09:53:11

How well people with newly diagnosed epilepsy respond to their first drug treatment, may signal the likelihood that they will continue to have uncontrolled seizures according to University of Melbourne Chair of Neurology Professor Patrick Kwan. In a study published in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, Professor Kwan, who is also head of the clinical epilepsy program at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and an international authority in antiepileptic drug...

2012-05-10 05:26:03

(Ivanhoe Newswire) —They say first impressions are lasting impressions--and for people with epilepsy the way they respond to their first drug treatment could tell doctors a lot about the likelihood of future seizures. "Our research shows a pattern based on how a person responds to initial treatment and specifically, to their first two courses of drug treatment," study author Patrick Kwan, M.D., Ph.D., with the University of Melbourne in Australia was quoted as saying. For the...

2012-04-11 09:28:30

Patients with 'pseudo-seizures' often misdiagnosed Based on their clinical experience and observations, a team of Johns Hopkins physicians and psychologists say that more than one-third of the patients admitted to The Johns Hopkins Hospital's inpatient epilepsy monitoring unit for treatment of intractable seizures have been discovered to have stress-triggered symptoms rather than a true seizure disorder. These patients – returning war veterans, mothers in child-custody battles and...

2012-03-30 10:32:01

An estimated 2.2 million people in the United States live with epilepsy, a complex brain disorder characterized by sudden and often unpredictable seizures. The highest rate of onset occurs in children and older adults, and it affects people of all ethnicities and socio-economic backgrounds, yet this common disorder is widely misunderstood. Epilepsy refers to a spectrum of disorders with seizures that vary in type, cause, severity, and frequency. Many people do not know the causes of epilepsy...

2012-03-07 13:45:00

Most patients wait until it's too late to prevent serious disability While the thought of any type of surgery can be disconcerting, the thought of brain surgery can be downright frightening. But for people with a particular form of epilepsy, surgical intervention can literally be life-restoring. Yet among people who suffer from what's known as medically intractable epilepsy, in which seizures are resistant to drugs, only a small fraction will seek surgery, seeing it only as a last...

2012-03-07 12:27:18

Patients report freedom from seizures and quality of life improvement Due to overwhelming clinical results, neurologists should advocate for early surgical evaluation of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE), according to physicians and co-authors Roger J. Lewis, M.D., Ph.D., an emergency medicine physician and expert in clinical trial design at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute (LA BioMed) at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center in Torrance, California, and Donald L. Schomer,...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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