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Latest Junk DNA Stories

2012-02-16 14:46:21

Worth EUR 1.94 million Dr. Zsuzsanna Izsvák, research group leader at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) Berlin-Buch, has been named recipient of a European Research Council (ERC Advanced) grant worth EUR 1.94 million for her research on "jumping genes" (transposons). With the aid of the ERC grant, in the next five years she will focus on investigating how mobile DNA elements (transposons) influence the pathogenesis of cancer and other...

2011-09-26 11:24:59

Genetic parasites invaded the mammalian genome more than 100 million years ago and dramatically changed the way mammals reproduce -- transforming the uterus in the ancestors of humans and other mammals from the production of eggs to a nurturing home for developing young, a new Yale University study has found. The findings published online Sept. 25 in the journal Nature Genetics describe in unprecedented detail the molecular changes that allowed mammals to carry their developing young...

2011-05-03 13:50:00

Biologist says no in new book The Myth of Junk DNA SEATTLE, May 3, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Forty years ago scientists discovered that more than 95% of our DNA does not encode proteins. Since then the non-protein-coding portion was labeled "junk" and attributed to molecular accidents that have accumulated in the course of evolution. Now, biologist Dr. Jonathan Wells exposes The Myth of Junk DNA (Discovery Institute Press 2011) and shows that contrary to being just evolutionary...

2011-02-28 15:00:21

Part of the answer to how and why primates differ from other mammals, and humans differ from other primates, may lie in the repetitive stretches of the genome that were once considered "junk." A new study by researchers at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine finds that when a particular type of repetitive DNA segment, known as an Alu element, is inserted into existing genes, they can alter the rate at which proteins are produced -- a mechanism that could contribute to the...

2010-06-07 13:39:41

Scientists at the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), a biomedical research institute of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), and their colleagues from the National University of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School and Princeton University have recently discovered that viruses that "Ëœinvaded' the human genome millions of years ago have changed the way genes get turned on and off in human embryonic stem (ES) cells. The...

2010-01-05 14:46:00

Scientists at The University of Nottingham have found that a group of genetic rogue elements, produced by DNA sequences commonly known as "Ëœjunk DNA', could help diagnose breast and bowel cancer. Their research, funded by Cancer Research UK, is published in this month's Genomics journal. The researchers, led by Dr Cristina Tufarelli, in the School of Graduate Entry Medicine and Health Sciences, discovered that seven of these faulty genetic elements "” known as chimeric...

2009-09-21 09:54:40

Scientists have identified how a protein enables sections of so-called junk DNA to be cut and pasted within genetic code "“ a finding which could speed development of gene therapies. The study by researchers at the University of Edinburgh sheds light on the process, known as DNA transposition, in which shifted genes have a significant effect on the behavior of neighboring genes. In the human genome, rearrangement of antibody genes can enable the immune system to target infection more...

2009-05-26 13:43:38

U.S. scientists studying the genetics of the pond organism Oxytricha have determined so-called junk DNA might not be so junky after all. The researchers said scientists have long been perplexed by junk DNA -- extensive strands of genetic material that dominate the genome, but seem to lack specific functions. Now researchers from Princeton and Indiana Universities have discovered DNA sequences from regions of what had been viewed as the dispensable genome are actually performing functions...

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2009-05-21 09:20:00

Scientists have called it "junk DNA." They have long been perplexed by these extensive strands of genetic material that dominate the genome but seem to lack specific functions. Why would nature force the genome to carry so much excess baggage? Now researchers from Princeton University and Indiana University who have been studying the genome of a pond organism have found that junk DNA may not be so junky after all. They have discovered that DNA sequences from regions of what had been viewed as...

2008-10-05 03:00:09

By Ehrenberg, Rachel Genes & Cells 'Junk DNA' helps to distinguish people from other primates Genes alone don't make the man - after all, humans and chimps share roughly 98 percent of their DNA. But where, when and how much genes are turned on may be essential in setting people apart from other primates. A stretch of human DNA inserted into mice embryos revs up gene activity in developing thumbs, toes and limbs. But the chimp and rhesus macaque version of that DNA spurs only faint...


Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
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