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Latest Jyllands-Posten Muhammad cartoons controversy Stories

2006-02-04 07:02:30

By Nidal al-Mughrabi GAZA (Reuters) - Palestinian youths tried on Saturday to storm the European Union office in Gaza in protest over the printing by European newspapers of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad that has whipped up fury across the Islamic world. The leaders of Muslim-majority Indonesia and Malaysia added their voices to the chorus of condemnation of the cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad, one with a turban resembling a bomb, in a face-off between freedom of speech and...

2006-02-04 05:12:28

JAKARTA (Reuters) - The leaders of Muslim-majority Indonesia and Malaysia added their voices on Saturday to the condemnation of cartoons depicting Prophet Mohammad, whose publication has sparked outrage across the Islamic world. But there was no repeat of Friday's protests in Jakarta and elsewhere in Asia, and both Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and Malaysian Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi called on their countries' Muslims to exercise restraint. "The Indonesian...

2006-02-03 17:35:45

By Michael Conlon CHICAGO (Reuters) - North American newspapers have given extensive coverage to the anger that cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad unleashed across the world but have taken a hands-off approach to reprinting the caricatures themselves. "I don't see it as a necessity to run them," said John Diaz, editorial page editor of the San Francisco Chronicle. "There's a lot of ways that we can gratuitously offend our readers. We want to avoid that." Muslims generally believe...

2006-02-03 14:40:15

By Kerstin Gehmlich PARIS (Reuters) - European leaders called on Friday for restraint as Muslims staged growing protests over cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad they consider blasphemous and more newspapers reprinted the images in the name of press freedom. Muslim protests in Indonesia, Turkey and the Palestinian West Bank staged violent demonstrations against the caricatures of the Prophet Mohammad, one with a turban resembling a bomb. "I am concerned...about this escalation we have...

2006-02-03 13:26:18

By Kerstin Gehmlich PARIS (Reuters) - European leaders on Friday called for restraint as more newspapers published caricatures of the Prophet Mohammad, saying freedom of speech was sacrosanct, and Muslims protested against the jokes they consider blasphemous. Muslim protesters in Indonesia, Turkey and the Palestinian West Bank staged violent demonstrations against the cartoons depicting the Prophet Mohammad, one with a turban resembling a bomb. "I am concerned...about this...

2006-02-03 11:25:14

By Tom Heneghan, Religion Editor PARIS (Reuters) - The row over caricatures of Islam's Prophet Mohammad resembles a dialogue of the deaf, with many European spokesmen defending the right to free speech and many Muslims insisting Islam must be treated with respect. Calls for moderation, both from Muslim leaders and European politicians, risk getting lost in a public debate dominated by Europeans afraid of losing a core right of their culture and Muslims struggling to win more...

2006-02-03 07:42:42

RIYADH (Reuters) - A leading preacher in Saudi Arabia proclaimed a new spirit of defiance among Muslims after worldwide protests over cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad in European newspapers. "A great new spirit is flowing through the body of the Islamic nation ... this world can no longer ignore this nation and its feelings," Saleh bin Humaid said in a televised sermon at the Grand Mosque in the Muslim city of Mecca. "The nation has fought to back its Prophet Mohammad in recent...

2006-02-03 09:18:33

By Kerstin Gehmlich PARIS (Reuters) - Denmark said on Friday it could not apologize for cartoons in a Danish newspaper depicting the Prophet Mohammad as outrage spread across the Muslim world from the Middle East to countries in Asia. More European newspapers published the cartoons on Friday, arguing freedom of speech was sacred, but angry Muslims staged violent protests against jokes they consider "blasphemous." "Neither the Danish government nor the Danish nation as such can be...

2006-02-03 08:45:55

By Kerstin Gehmlich PARIS (Reuters) - Outrage spread across the Islamic world on Friday over Danish cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad, as Muslims condemned them as "blasphemous" and more European newspapers published them, arguing freedom of speech was sacred. Up to 300 militant Indonesian Muslims went on a rampage in the lobby of a building housing the Danish embassy in Jakarta. Shouting "Allahu Akbar" (God is Greatest), they smashed lamps with bamboo sticks, threw chairs, lobbed...

2006-02-03 06:40:00

By Kerstin Gehmlich PARIS -- Outrage spread across the Islamic world on Friday over Danish cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad, as Muslims condemned them as "blasphemous" and more European newspapers published them, arguing freedom of speech was sacred. Up to 300 militant Indonesian Muslims went on a rampage in the lobby of a building housing the Danish embassy in Jakarta. Shouting "Allahu Akbar" (God is Greatest), they smashed lamps with bamboo sticks, threw chairs, lobbed rotten eggs and...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.