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Latest Kaposi's sarcoma Stories

2012-03-12 21:22:42

New research from the Trudeau Institute addresses how the human body controls gamma-herpesviruses, a class of viruses thought to cause a variety of cancers.

2011-12-14 19:44:17

Human tumor viruses contribute to 15-20% of human cancers worldwide.

2011-04-11 22:14:31

The number of cancers and the types of cancers among people living with AIDS in the U.S. have changed dramatically during the 15-year period from 1991-2005.

2011-01-20 22:03:33

In a new paper published Jan. 21 in the journal Science, a team of researchers led by Microbiology and Immunology professor Blossom Damania, PhD, has shown for the first time that the Kaposi sarcoma virus has a decoy protein that impedes a key molecule involved in the human immune response.

2010-05-07 10:33:19

Research from the University of Leeds has identified how the virus which causes Kaposi's Sarcoma replicates and spreads – opening a door to a possible new treatment for the disease.

2009-09-25 14:09:50

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found that non-AIDS-defining malignancies such as anal and lung cancer have become more prevalent among HIV-infected patients than non-HIV patients since the introduction of anti-retroviral therapies in the mid-1990s.


Latest Kaposi's sarcoma Reference Libraries

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2011-02-17 15:06:48

Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) one of seven currently known human cancer virus, is also the eighth human herpesvirus. Kaposi's sarcoma, caused by the virus, is common in AIDS patients, primary effusion lymphoma, and some types of multicentric Castelman's disease. Moritz Kaposi discovered the blood vessel tumor, in 1872, which would eventually be names Kaposi's sarcoma. It was originally though that KS was of Jewish and Mediterranean origins until it was found to be common...

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Word of the Day
begunk
  • To befool; deceive; balk; jilt.
  • An illusion; a trick; a cheat.
The word 'begunk' may come from a nasalised variant of Scots begeck ("to deceive, disappoint"), equivalent to be- +‎ geck.