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Latest Karl Deisseroth Stories

2014-04-25 10:11:04

Leaps orders of magnitude beyond existing tools -- NIH study Scientists have bioengineered, in neurons cultured from rats, an enhancement to a cutting edge technology that provides instant control over brain circuit activity with a flash of light. The research funded by the National Institutes of Health adds the same level of control over turning neurons off that, until now, had been limited to turning them on. "What had been working through a weak pump can now work through a highly...

All About CLARITY: Scientists Develop See-Through Brain
2013-04-11 08:22:08

WATCH VIDEO: [3D Analysis Of Intact Mouse Hippocampus] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A multidisciplinary team from Stanford University School of Medicine has combined neuroscience and chemical engineering to develop a process that renders a mouse brain transparent, no slicing required. Not sliced or sectioned in any way, the postmortem brain remains whole with its 3D complexity of fine wiring and molecular structure completely intact and able to be measured using...

2012-12-13 12:23:05

Light instantly triggers or reverses depression-like states in rodents -- NIH-funded studies A specific pattern of neuronal firing in a brain reward circuit instantly rendered mice vulnerable to depression-like behavior induced by acute severe stress, a study supported by the National Institutes of Health has found. When researchers used a high-tech method to mimic the pattern, previously resilient mice instantly succumbed to a depression-like syndrome of social withdrawal and reduced...

Motivation Pathways In The Brain Can Fail And Cause Depression
2012-11-19 06:37:26

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers from Stanford University have isolated the neurons responsible for determining whether or not exerting effort in order to complete a task is worth the energy that said effort will require -- a discovery which could help medical professionals better deal with depression and other brain-related disorders. According to the university, many psychiatrists believe that a person's "will to act" originates from the prefrontal...

2011-07-28 01:01:37

Researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine have been able to switch on, and then switch off, social-behavior deficits in mice that resemble those seen in people with autism and schizophrenia, thanks to a technology that allows scientists to precisely manipulate nerve activity in the brain. In synchrony with this experimentally induced socially aberrant behavior, the mice exhibited a brain-wave pattern called gamma oscillation that has been associated with autism and schizophrenia...

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2011-03-10 13:59:11

Study uses NSF-supported technology to identify neuronal circuitry A new study sheds light--both literally and figuratively--on the intricate brain cell connections responsible for anxiety. Scientists at Stanford University recently used light to activate mouse neurons and precisely identify neural circuits that increase or decrease anxiety-related behaviors. Pinpointing the origin of anxiety brings psychiatric professionals closer to understanding anxiety disorders, the most common class of...

2011-03-09 16:32:53

Stimulation of a distinct brain circuit that lies within a brain structure typically associated with fearfulness produces the opposite effect: Its activity, instead of triggering or increasing anxiety, counters it. That's the finding in a paper by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers to be published online March 9 in Nature. In the study, Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD, and his colleagues employed a mouse model to show that stimulating activity exclusively in this circuit enhances...

2010-09-27 14:04:40

Researchers at Stanford University were able to use light to induce normal patterns of muscle contraction, in a study involving bioengineered mice whose nerve-cell surfaces are coated with special light-sensitive proteins. The new approach allows scientists to more accurately reproduce muscle firing order, making it a valuable research tool. The investigators, from Stanford's Schools of Medicine and of Engineering, also believe this technique could someday spawn practical applications, from...

2010-03-18 14:30:46

Recently, brain researchers have gained a powerful new way to troubleshoot neural circuits associated with depression, Parkinson's disease and other conditions in small animals such as rats. They use an optogenetics technology, invented at Stanford University, that precisely turns select brain cells on or off with flashes of light. Although useful, the optogenetics tool set has been limited. In a paper to be published in the April 2 edition of Cell, the Stanford researchers describe major...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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