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Latest Karyotype Stories

2014-06-17 13:41:26

A UT Arlington research team says their study of genetic information from more than 4,000 beetle species has yielded a new theory about why some species lose their Y chromosome and others, such as humans, hang on to it.

2014-04-18 15:41:30

When talking about genetic abnormalities at the DNA level that occur when chromosomes swap, delete or add parts, there is an evolving communication gap both in the science and medical worlds, leading to inconsistencies in clinical and research reports.

Chromosomal Evolution Advancement In Sea Cradles
2012-12-12 15:45:38

The study of chromosome changes arisen during species evolution is a current and intriguing topic that evolutionary biology proposes.

Genetic Test Reveals More About Potential Birth Defects Than Conventional Methods
2012-12-06 11:43:12

Two new papers published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) show that genetic testing in early pregnancy reveals far more about potential birth defects and stillbirth risk than current prenatal testing does, based on a multi-center clinical trial using both methods.

A Look At The Early Evolution Of Sex Chromosomes
2012-08-06 18:24:30

Two new studies offer insight into sex chromosome evolution by focusing on papaya, a multimillion dollar crop plant with a sexual problem (as far as growers are concerned) and a complicated past.

Does Polyploidy Play A Role In The Italian Endemic Flora?
2012-05-22 08:24:01

Besides the obvious differences between plants and animals, subtle ones lie concealed within the cell, even within the nucleus.

2012-02-10 00:07:51

A nationwide, federally funded study has found that testing a developing fetus' DNA through chromosomal microarray (CMA) provides more information about potential disorders than does the standard method of prenatal testing, which is to visually examine the chromosomes (karyotyping).


Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.