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Latest Karyotype Stories

2012-01-30 08:05:57

Stress-induced genomic instability facilitates rapid cellular adaption in yeast Cells trying to keep pace with constantly changing environmental conditions need to strike a fine balance between maintaining their genomic integrity and allowing enough genetic flexibility to adapt to inhospitable conditions. In their latest study, researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research were able to show that under stressful conditions yeast genomes become unstable, readily acquiring or...

2012-01-23 21:58:16

Chromosome aberrations happen in pairs when it comes to cancer, TAU research finds A healthy genome is characterized by 23 pairs of chromosomes, and even a small change in this structure – such as an extra copy of a single chromosome – can lead to severe physical impairment. So it's no surprise that when it comes to cancer, chromosomal structure is frequently a contributing factor, says Prof. Ron Shamir of the Blavatnik School of Computer Science at Tel Aviv University. Now...

2012-01-19 20:43:58

They are the Robinson Crusoes of the intracellular world -- lone chromosomes, whole and hardy, stranded outside the nucleus where their fellow chromosomes reside. Such castaways, each confined to its own "micronucleus," are often found in cancer cells, but scientists haven't known what role, if any, they play in the cancer process. In a paper published online on Jan. 18 by the journal Nature, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers have mapped out a mechanism by which micronuclei could...

2011-11-04 21:36:49

North Carolina State University researchers have uncovered evidence that evolutionary “breakpoints” on canine chromosomes are also associated with canine cancer. Mapping these “fragile” regions in dogs may also have implications for the discovery and treatment of human cancers. When new species evolve, they leave genetic evidence behind in the form of “breakpoint regions.” These regions are sites on the genome where chromosomes broke during speciation...

2011-09-19 23:08:35

Research Disputes Established Theory on Chromosome Activity Fruit flies have been indispensible to our understanding of genetics and biological processes in all animals, including humans. Yet, despite being one of the most studied of animals, scientists are still finding the fruit fly to be capable of surprises, as evidenced by new research at the University of Rochester. The latest revelation has to do with the activity of the X chromosome in male fruit flies. It was widely accepted...

2011-09-19 05:26:08

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A chromosomal "catastrophe" that occurs early in development may be to blame for some cases of developmental delay or cognitive disorders, according to new research. Investigators from Baylor College of Medicine analyzed the DNA of 17 patients who were referred to their center because of unexplained developmental problems. "Four were very complex," Dr. Pengfei Liu, a graduate student at BCM, was quoted as saying. "One had 18 rearrangements in one chromosome. It was...

2011-09-15 05:14:56

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- A chromosomal "catastrophe" that occurs early in development may be to blame for some cases of developmental delay or cognitive disorders, according to new research. Investigators from Baylor College of Medicine analyzed the DNA of 17 patients who were referred to their center because of unexplained developmental problems. "Four were very complex," Dr. Pengfei Liu, a graduate student at BCM, was quoted as saying. "One had 18 rearrangements in one chromosome. It was...

2011-07-26 22:15:16

Cancer patients may view their tumors as parasites taking over their bodies, but this is more than a metaphor for Peter Duesberg, a molecular and cell biology professor at the University of California, Berkeley. Cancerous tumors are parasitic organisms, he said. Each one is a new species that, like most parasites, depends on its host for food, but otherwise operates independently and often to the detriment of its host. In a paper published in the July 1 issue of the journal Cell Cycle,...

2011-07-22 14:17:40

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have uncovered the evolutionary mechanisms that have caused increases or decreases in the numbers of chromosomes in a group of yeast species during the last 100-150 million years. The study, to be published on July 21st in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics, offers an unprecedented view of chromosome complement (chromosome number) changes in a large group of related species. A few specific cases of chromosome number changes have been studied in...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.