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Latest Keele University Stories

2014-01-22 10:40:24

British Muslims with diabetes may avoid attending GP surgeries to discuss fasting during the holy month of Ramadan with potentially serious consequences for their future health, new research by the universities of Manchester and Keele shows British Muslims with diabetes may avoid attending GP surgeries to discuss fasting during the holy month of Ramadan – with potentially serious consequences for their future health, new research by the universities of Manchester and Keele shows. The...

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2011-04-18 11:20:00

Stubbed your toe lately or smashed a finger? Then you very likely uttered an expletive or two and felt better. Researchers have found that letting it out, at least, for those who don't use expletives in normal, everyday speech, can lessen sudden and unexpected pains, the Daily Mail reports. Researchers at Keele University wanted to study if cursing in response to pain had any actual benefits. Lead researcher Dr. Richard Stephens said the results show that swearing can release pain-killing...

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2009-08-27 10:05:00

Astronomers recently discovered a planet that is on a suicidal orbit dangerously close to its parent star, which will eventually lead to its demise. Writing in the journal Nature, Coel Hellier, a professor of astrophysics at the Keele University in England, reported the discovery of planet WASP-18b, named for the Wide Angle Search for Planets, by which it was discovered. At ten times the mass of Jupiter, WASP-18b has an orbital period of 0.94 days. Its orbit results in a strong...

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2009-02-16 10:38:58

A light source as bright as a million-watt bulb may help scientists identify the early signs of Parkinson's disease. The Keele University team stated at a conference on Sunday that a "super-microscope" could identify any shifts in brain cells prior to being destroyed by the disease. Keele's Dr. Joanna Collingwood feels that this innovative procedure is "pioneering." She stated to the American Association for the Advancement of Science that patients could be helped before the disease really...

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2009-01-22 10:36:34

Keele University has developed a "virtual patient" to help train the pharmacists of the future. Students in the Staffordshire-based university's School of Pharmacy interact with the computer-generated characters to gain experience in effective communication and decision-making. Learners talk with the "patient" via voice recognition technology or by typing questions into a standard computer interface and the "patient" responds verbally or with a range of non-verbal gestures to indicate...

2008-07-06 00:00:23

The North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary began life as a voluntary hospital, which lasted until the National Health Service arrived in 1948. In 1804, a dispensary offering free advice and medicines was established in Etruria, and a fever ward, called the House of Recovery, was built in order to treat the infectious diseases that were rife in the area. These buildings stood near to the site of the present Etruria Industrial Museum. However, rapid industrial development and increased...

2008-06-18 00:00:30

Medical students will be holding a Teddy Bear Hospital for young children later this month. The Keele University branch of Medsin will be hosting the event at Forsbrook Primary School, in Cheadle Road, Blythe Bridge, at 1pm on June 25. The event offers the opportunity for one-to-one consultations with children, increasing confidence for the students while reducing childhood anxiety about hospitals and doctors, and promoting child health. Medical students will deliver workshops on...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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