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Beautiful But A Threat Tropical Fish Invasion Destroys Help

Beautiful But A Threat: Tropical Fish Invasion Destroys Help Forests

University of New South Wales The migration of tropical fish as a result of ocean warming poses a serious threat to the temperate areas they invade, because they overgraze on kelp forests and seagrass meadows, a new study concludes. The...

Latest Kelp forest Stories

Oysters And Crabs 'Stuck In The Middle'
2014-05-12 03:30:49

By Angela Herring, Northeastern University Northeastern University ecologist David Kimbro claims to have watched a lot of TV growing up, particularly The Brady Bunch. “You could kind of get a flavor for how an episode was going to turn out based on how Jan or Peter were faring—you know, the middle kids,” said Kimbro, an assistant professor in the Department of Marine and Environmental Sciences. He and his colleagues—associate professor Jon Grabowski and assistant professor...

Fukushima Radiation May Be Lurking In West Coast Kelp Forests
2014-02-05 04:35:01

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online With radiation-tainted waters from the Fukushima nuclear disaster expected to wash up on American shores this year, California scientists are taking steps to monitor West Coast waters for radioactivity. According to a U-T San Diego report, researchers from San Diego State University will begin testing kelp beds off the coast of California for radiation levels. The San Diego scientists said hazardous radioisotopes cesium-134 and...

2013-07-17 11:01:52

University of Adelaide marine biologists have found that reducing nutrient pollution in coastal marine environments should help protect kelp forests from the damaging effects of rising CO2. The researchers have found a combined effect on kelp forests from nutrient pollution and higher CO2, which could have a devastating impact on Australia's marine ecosystems. "When we manipulated CO2 and nutrient levels in an experimental marine ecosystem we found the effect of both of them together...

Ecological Tipping Points Examined In Hopes Of Preventing Them
2012-10-31 09:26:37

University of California - Santa Barbara Predation by otters keeps urchin populations in check, allowing kelp —— a favorite food of urchins —— to flourish. But what if otters were harvested to near extinction for their fur? The resulting overabundance of urchins would decimate the kelp forest, leaving little food or shelter for fish and invertebrates. And so it may go, as declines in these species are likely to affect others. Such is the potential trickle-down...

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2012-09-08 08:38:37

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online How can sea otters change the world? A new study, led by the University of California, Santa Cruz, suggests that a thriving population of sea otters will keep the sea urchins in check, which will in turn allow kelp forests to prosper.  Spreading kelp forests can absorb as much as 12 times the amount of CO2 from the atmosphere than if it were subject to sea urchin ravaging. "It is significant because it shows that animals can...

2012-06-01 10:10:12

Major new marine herbivory study Coral reefs and seashores largely look the way they do because large fish and urchins eat most of the seaweed that might otherwise cover them, but a major new study has found that the greatest impact of all comes from an unexpected quarter — small marine snails. The study published in the journal Ecology Letters is the largest of its kind ever undertaken into the ecological impacts of marine grazing animals: it was led by Associate Professor...

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2011-05-26 10:05:44

By Cheryl Dybas, NSF Marine scientists discover wave disturbance, nutrient levels affect California giant kelp growth Marine scientists have a new view of the giant kelp in the Pacific Ocean--through a scuba mask and a satellite's "eye." Forests of giant kelp, or Macrocystis pyrifera, are found in temperate coastal regions and are among the most productive ecosystems on Earth. In a melding of data from the beneath the waves and from the skies above, researchers have developed a method for...

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2011-05-19 07:59:53

Scientists at UC Santa Barbara have developed new methods for studying how environmental factors and climate affect giant kelp forest ecosystems at unprecedented spatial and temporal scales. The scientists merged data collected underwater by UCSB divers with satellite images of giant kelp canopies taken by the Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper. The findings are published in the feature article of the May 16 issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series. In this marriage of marine ecology and satellite...

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2010-07-01 09:08:18

A new analysis of the extinction of woolly mammoths and other large mammals more than 10,000 years ago suggests that they may have fallen victim to the same type of "trophic cascade" of ecosystem disruption that scientists say is being caused today by the global decline of predators such as wolves, cougars, and sharks. In each case the cascading events were originally begun by human disruption of ecosystems, a new study concludes, but around 15,000 years ago the problem was not the loss of a...

2010-03-08 12:20:00

New Permanent Exhibition Wing Features Innovative Exhibits Combined with Live Habitats LOS ANGELES, March 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The California Science Center will unveil a new permanent exhibition wing, Ecosystems, at a ribbon-cutting ceremony on March 25, 2010. The major expansion nearly doubles the volume of exhibition space at the Science Center and features an unprecedented blend of live animals, and hands-on science exhibits in 11 immersive environments - unique among science...


Latest Kelp forest Reference Libraries

Bocaccio, Sebastes paucispinis
2013-10-22 10:58:24

The Bocaccio (Sebastes paucispinis) is a member of the Sebastidae rockfish family. Other names regarding this species include the Salmon Grouper, Grouper, Tom Cod referring to juveniles, and Slimy. In Greek, sebastes means “magnificent” and paucispinis is Latin for “few spines”. These fish can be found from Stepovak Bay, Alaska to central Baja California, but is mostly abundant from Oregon to the northern part of Baja California. They have been seen from a variety of depths from...

Kelp Forest
2013-04-19 19:29:03

Kelp forests are areas that are underwater with a high density of kelp. They’re recognized as one of the most dynamic and productive ecosystems on Earth. Smaller regions of anchored kelp are known as kelp beds. Kelp forests can be found worldwide throughout polar and temperate coastal oceans. In the year 2007, kelp forests were discovered in tropical waters near Ecuador as well. While they are physically formed by brown macroalgae of the order Laminariales, kelp forests offer a unique...

Horn Shark, Heterodontus francisci
2009-01-20 20:37:50

The Horn Shark (Heterodontus francisci) is a species of bullhead shark that ranges from central California to the Gulf of California, Mexico, and possibly Ecuador and Peru. Its habitat includes rocky reefs, kelp beds, sand flats, crevices, and caverns at depths from 7 to 490 feet. It is mostly nocturnal and is rather sluggish in the daytime. The adult can reach a length of 4 feet and weigh about 22 pounds. It is brown with black spots. If harassed it may bite. It has poisonous spines on...

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2007-01-23 14:07:41

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a large otter native to the North Pacific, from northern Japan and Kamchatka east across the Aleutian Islands south to California. The heaviest of the otters, sea otters are the only species within the genus Enhydra. They were hunted extensively for their luxurious fur. Its estimated that a half million to a million otters were killed over time. The population is thought to have been 150,000 to 300,000 historically before the years of the great hunt....

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.