Quantcast

Latest Ken Caldeira Stories

CIA Investigating How To Manipulate Climate Change
2013-07-19 15:51:48

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online In a move that sounds vaguely reminiscent of one of Dr. Evil's plans, the CIA is planning to investigate how humans could potentially control the global climate. The 21-month project being run by the National Academy of Sciences and partially being funded by the CIA "is intended to provide a careful, clear scientific foundation that informs ethical, legal, and political discussions surrounding geoengineering," according to...

Solar Geoengineering Methods Should Be Targeted
2012-10-22 09:40:50

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Sometimes, the best solution to a problem is the easiest one. The real difficulty lies in the application of said solution. Take, for instance, the issue of global warming and greenhouse gasses. The simplest solution to these matters is to somehow block some of the sun´s harmful rays from the Earth, bringing the temperature down and, ideally, stop the melting of the polar ice caps and other effects of global warming. The...

2012-07-04 23:46:54

When evaluating the historic contributions made by different countries to the greenhouse gasses found in Earth's atmosphere, calculations generally go back no further than the year 1840. New research from Carnegie's Julia Pongratz and Ken Caldeira shows that carbon dioxide contributions from the pre-industrial era still have an impact on our climate today. Their work is published in Environmental Research Letters. The burning of fossil fuels that came with industrialization released...

2012-02-16 14:27:51

Could replacing coal-fired electricity plants with generators fueled by natural gas bring global warming to a halt in this century? What about rapid construction of massive numbers of solar or wind farms, hydroelectric dams, or nuclear reactors–or the invention of new technology for capturing the carbon dioxide produced by fossil-fueled power plants and storing it permanently underground? Nathan Myhrvold of Intellectual Ventures teamed up with Carnegie Institution's Ken Caldeira to...

2012-01-23 11:21:10

Carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of coal, oil, and gas have been increasing over the past decades, causing the Earth to get hotter and hotter. There are concerns that a continuation of these trends could have catastrophic effects, including crop failures in the heat-stressed tropics. This has led some to explore drastic ideas for combating global warming, including the idea of trying to counteract it by reflecting sunlight away from the Earth. However, it has been suggested that...

2011-10-17 21:57:49

It is difficult to measure accurately each nation's contribution of carbon dioxide to the Earth's atmosphere. Carbon is extracted out of the ground as coal, gas, and oil, and these fuels are often exported to other countries where they are burned to generate the energy that is used to make products. In turn, these products may be traded to still other countries where they are consumed. A team led by Carnegie's Steven Davis, and including Ken Caldeira, tracked and quantified this supply chain...

2011-05-10 15:09:14

Accurately calculating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted in the process of producing and bringing products to our doorsteps is nearly impossible, but still a worthwhile effort, two Carnegie researchers claim in a commentary published online this week by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The Global Ecology department's Ken Caldeira and Steven Davis commend the work of industrial ecologist Glen Peters and colleagues, published in the same journal late last month, and use that...

2011-04-14 15:28:30

Scientists have known for decades that black carbon aerosols add to global warming. These airborne particles made of sooty carbon are believed to be among the largest man-made contributors to global warming because they absorb solar radiation and heat the atmosphere. New research from Carnegie's Long Cao and Ken Caldeira, along with colleagues George Ban-Weiss and Govindasamy Bala, quantifies how black carbon's impact on climate depends on its altitude in the atmosphere. Their work, published...

2011-03-24 20:09:50

Recent climate modeling has shown that reducing the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere would give the Earth a wetter climate in the short term. New research from Carnegie Global Ecology scientists Long Cao and Ken Caldeira offers a novel explanation for why climates are wetter when atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are decreasing. Their findings, published online today by Geophysical Research Letters, show that cutting carbon dioxide concentrations could help...

2010-10-04 14:21:00

DALLAS, Oct. 4 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Like it or not, a climate change emergency is possible, and various approaches collectively called geoengineering could be the only affordable and fast-acting ways to avoid a catastrophe, according to an article in the fall Issues in Science and Technology. According to authors Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution and David Keith of the University of Calgary, world leaders may at some point be compelled to act to prevent further global...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
Related