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Latest Kevin Shakesheff Stories

Artificial 'Womb' Unlocks Secrets Of Early Embryo Development
2012-03-03 04:47:44

Pioneering work by a leading University of Nottingham scientist has helped reveal for the first time a vital process in the development of the early mammalian embryo. A team led by Professor of Tissue Engineering, Kevin Shakesheff, has created a new device in the form of a soft polymer bowl which mimics the soft tissue of the mammalian uterus in which the embryo implants. The research has been published in the journal Nature Communications. This new laboratory culture method has allowed...

2010-06-15 14:14:00

PORTLAND, Ore., June 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A team of researchers at the University of Nottingham have invented a new class of materials that can be injected by surgeons as a low-viscosity fluid into the body that, using body heat as the only trigger, converts into a tough porous material with mechanical properties that mimic human cancellous bone. The mechanism of converting from a liquid to solid is novel, and is so gentle that the injectable bone can carry living stem cells and...

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2008-12-08 12:27:47

Scientists in the UK have come up with an injectable substance that may remove the need for painful grafting of broken bones. Made by Professor Kevin Shakesheff and colleagues at Nottingham University, the biodegradable substance known as "the injectable bone" won a prestigious medical innovation award last week, and researchers hope the substance will be used in the U.S. within 18 months. The toothpaste-like substance forms a scaffold over which the body's own bone grows. While...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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