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Latest King's College London Stories

2009-12-03 15:57:01

Leading mental health researchers are warning that some of the most important health consequences of climate change will be on mental health, yet this issue is unlikely to be given much attention at the UN climate change conference in Copenhagen next week. Dr Lisa Page and Dr Louise Howard from the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) at King's College London reviewed a range of recent research by scientists into the potential mental health impacts of climate change. In an article published in...

2009-11-17 13:36:43

A study by researchers at the University of Bergen, Norway, and the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) at King's College London has found that depression is as much of a risk factor for mortality as smoking. Utilising a unique link between a survey of over 60,000 people and a comprehensive mortality database, the researchers found that over the four years following the survey, the mortality risk was increased to a similar extent in people who were depressed as in people who were smokers. Dr Robert...

2009-10-26 21:40:37

A new study by researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP), King's College London has discovered abnormalities in the white matter of the brain that seem to be critical for the timing of schizophrenia. The study, led by Professor Phillip McGuire and Dr Sophia Frangou, has been published in this month's edition of the British Journal of Psychiatry. The white matter of the brain consists of nerve fibers that connect parts of the brain and help regulate behavior. The normal brain develops...

2009-10-22 13:15:07

A new study in China has found that people with higher levels of pesticide exposure are more likely to have suicidal thoughts. The study was carried out by Dr Robert Stewart from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London together with scientists from Tongde Hospital Zhejiang Province. The agricultural pesticides commonly used in China are organophosphates which are in wide use in many lower income countries but have been banned in many Western nations. It is well known that they...

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2009-07-22 11:05:00

Experts believe a simple saliva test could help spot which expectant mothers are likely to go into premature labor, BBC News reported.New mothers going into labor very early (before 34 weeks gestation) had abnormally low progesterone levels in their saliva, according to UK researchers. When this can be identified early, it would enable these women to be given steroids, which help in the development of the baby's lungs, preventing disability and death.Over 50,000 babies a year in the UK are...

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2009-07-06 09:15:00

An innovative laser treatment may stop millions of elderly people from blindness, experts announced. This new technique can reverse the results of age-connected macular degeneration, which is the foremost cause of blindness in people over 60. Created by British eye expert John Marshall of King's College London, the pioneering laser refreshes the back of the eye to its once youthful condition. Sight enhancement was already reported in the early concept trials. AMD plagues 200,000 people in the...

2009-06-15 16:40:39

Scientists from King's College London and Imperial College London believe they have discovered a key element in the development of chronic asthma. Their research has been published in a new paper in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences to explain why the structure and function of asthmatic airways are changed or ''remodelled'' and how this contributes to chronic asthma.Remodelling occurs when the small airways in the lungs of people change gradually with time as their...

2009-06-02 10:44:50

New research findings published today by Dr Metin BaÅŸoÄŸlu, Head of Section of Trauma Studies at King's College London and the Istanbul Centre for Behaviour Research and Therapy, examines the psychological impact of war captivity, 'cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment' (CIDT) and physical torture. Findings revealed that being held captive in a hostile and life-threatening environment, deprivation of basic needs, sexual torture,...

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2009-04-11 07:55:00

Businesses and health authorities are increasingly rewarding people who lose weight, quit smoking or take medicine with money, despite doubts that such incentives work longer than a few months, according to a new report published online by the British Medical Journal (BMJ) on Friday. The trend raises an ethical dilemma for some, as physicians are put in a position of offering gifts in exchange for healthier lifestyles. Theresa Marteau, a health psychologist at King's College London, and her...

2009-04-02 14:06:00

NETANYA, Israel, April 2 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- RADA Electronic Industries Ltd. (NasdaqGS: RADA) today announced it has filed its annual report on Form 20-F containing audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2008 with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The annual report is available on the Company's website at www.rada.com. Shareholders may receive a hard copy of the annual report free of charge upon request. About RADA RADA Electronic...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'