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Latest King's College Stories

2012-02-14 11:49:35

Urgent action required to implement lifestyle changes to prevent onset of obesity and diabetes Scientists at King's College London and the National Diabetes Centre (Sri Lanka) have found evidence of a high number of risk factors for type 2 diabetes among the young urban population in Sri Lanka. The study is the first large-scale investigation into diabetes risk among children and young people in South Asia, and provides further evidence that the region is rapidly becoming a hotspot in the...

2012-02-03 09:07:38

Tuberculosis patients may receive treatments in the future according to what version they have of a single 'Goldilocks' gene 'Goldilocks' gene could determine best treatment for TB patients Tuberculosis patients may receive treatments in the future according to what version they have of a single 'Goldilocks' gene, says an international research team from Oxford University, King's College London, Vietnam and the USA. This is one of the first examples in infectious disease of where an...

2012-01-21 16:40:00

The London Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) last Thursday unveiled the WADA accredited anti-doping laboratory, which will operate during the London 2012 Games. (PRWEB) January 21, 2012 The London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) last Thursday unveiled the WADA accredited anti-doping laboratory which will operate during the London 2012 Games. LOCOG, laboratory service providers GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and laboratory operators...

2012-01-19 11:17:10

Although around two thirds of us would prefer to die at home, in the developed world the trend in recent years has been for the majority to spend their final days in an institutional setting. But according to new research available in the journal Palliative Medicine, published by SAGE and from King's College London, the tide has now turned and an increasing number of people in the UK are dying at home. In England and Wales, the number of deaths at home nearly halved from 1974 to 2003. If...

2011-12-07 22:14:04

Treating 'brain tsunamis' or 'killer waves' could stop many victims of major head injury from suffering additional brain damage, a study published in Lancet Neurology has found Treating 'brain tsunamis' or 'killer waves' could stop many victims of major head injury from suffering additional brain damage, a study published in Lancet Neurology has found. Scientists have been investigating this phenomenon for decades, with the topic of spreading depolarizations now of keen interest to the...

'Gold Standard' Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Developed
2011-12-07 06:32:45

Researchers from King's College London have produced the first animal product-free clinical grade human embryonic stem cell lines. Scientists have submitted to the U.K. Stem Cell Bank (UKSCB) their first clinical grade human embryonic stem (hES) cell lines that are free from animal-derived products, or "xeno-free". They expect that these cells will be grown and processed by the UKSCB to provide stem cell stocks that will be used for clinical research and treatment to benefit patients....

2011-12-06 22:49:15

King's College London researchers produce the first animal product-free clinical grade human embryonic stem cell lines intended for public benefit Stem cell scientists at King's College London will today (Tuesday 6 December) announce they have submitted to the UK Stem Cell Bank (UKSCB) their first clinical grade human embryonic stem (hES) cell lines that are free from animal-derived products, known as 'xeno-free' stem cells. The cells, which have the potential to become the 'gold...

2011-11-22 17:26:52

Researchers at King's College London have discovered how one of the most common household painkillers works, which could pave the way for less harmful pain relief medications to be developed in the future Researchers at King's College London have discovered how one of the most common household painkillers works, which could pave the way for less harmful pain relief medications to be developed in the future. Paracetamol, often known in the US and Asia as acetaminophen, is a widely-used...

2011-11-16 22:17:43

Scientists have developed a rapid method that can be used to simultaneously screen patients for a range of genetic and acquired clinical conditions from a single dried blood spot Scientists have developed a rapid method that can be used to simultaneously screen patients for a range of genetic and acquired clinical conditions from a single dried blood spot. The test uses a highly sensitive and specific technique, known as mass spectrometry, to simultaneously analyze proteins, enzymes and...

Cyberwar May Never Happen
2011-10-19 03:36:13

Cyber war, long considered by many experts within the defense establishment to be a significant threat, if not an ongoing one, may never take place according to Dr Thomas Rid of King´s College London. In a paper published in The Journal of Strategic Studies, Dr Thomas Rid, from the Department of War Studies, argues that cyber warfare has never taken place, nor is it currently doing so and it is unlikely to take place in the future. Dr Rid said: ℠The threat intuitively makes...


Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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