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Latest Kinship Stories

2014-09-17 23:01:22

Arizona’s Children Association kinship service providers were one of only seven kinship programs throughout the nation invited by Child Welfare League of America (CWLA) to present at the National Kinship Care Conference. Phoenix, Arizona (PRWEB) September 17, 2014 As kinship care continues to be a primary and valuable option for children who cannot live with their parents, emphasis on kinship care policy, practice, and research is necessary to continue to enhance services and supports...

2013-06-07 13:07:10

Many animals are able to discriminate between related and unrelated individuals but how they do so has proven remarkably difficult to understand. Joachim Frommen and colleagues at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna have investigated the issue using the three-spined stickleback and its shoaling preferences as a model system. It turns out that the fish prefer kin to unrelated conspecifics, regardless of how familiar they are with individual shoal members. The results indicate that...

It's In The Genes: Europeans Have Been One Big Family For Past Thousand Years
2013-05-08 07:34:50

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online If there is one thing you can say about families, it is the larger the better. And by looking at genetic data of people from Ireland to the Balkans, researchers have found that Europeans are one big family, and have been for the past thousand years. Graham Coop, a professor of evolution and ecology at UCDavis, and Peter Ralph, a professor at University of Southern California (USC), published a recent study of the genetics of...

Memory Tricks Help Us Keep Track Of Vast Social Networks
2013-03-22 05:20:52

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Humans keep track of our vast social networks by using special memory tricks that cheat complexity, rather than using routine memorization, according to a new Cornell University study. These memorization shortcuts effectively simplify rules, the way in which a person might remember a number sequence that always increases by two, according to lead author Matthew Brashears, assistant professor of sociology. People recall social...

2013-01-25 23:04:46

New book analyzes the psychological conditions of Nigerian women and highlights incidence of major traumatic events. London, United Kingdom (PRWEB) January 26, 2013 Women´s abuse in a patrilineal and kinship system has become significant while looking at the pattern in the colonial and post-colonial periods. This relates not only to the gender divisions of labour and the servicing activities of wives for their husbands but also to customary laws of inheritance, ownership of land, and...

2012-11-28 13:04:46

Men may share more genes with sisters' kids than with cheating wife's kids A University of Utah study produced new mathematical support for a theory that explains why men in some cultures often feed and care for their sisters' children: where extramarital sex is common and accepted, a man's genes are more likely to be passed on by their sister's kids than by their wife's kids. The theory previously was believed valid only if a man was likely to be the biological father of less than one...

2012-08-23 23:38:24

Friends are equally important to men and women, but family matters more for men's wellbeing The midlife wellbeing of both men and women seems to depend on having a wide circle of friends whom they see regularly, finds research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health. A network of relatives is also important–but only for men–shows the study of more than 6500 Britons born in 1958. The authors base their findings on information collected from the...

2012-05-25 10:02:00

Different languages refer to family relationships in different ways. For example, English speakers use two terms – grandmother and grandfather – to refer to grandparents, while Mandarin Chinese uses four terms. Many possible kinship categories, however, are never observed, which raises the question of why some kinship categories appear in the languages of the world but others do not. A new study published in Science by Carnegie Mellon University's Charles Kemp and the...

2011-09-13 11:22:09

It doesn't take a village to raise a child after all, according to University of Michigan research. "In the African villages that I study in Mali, children fare as well in nuclear families as they do in extended families," said U-M researcher Beverly Strassmann, professor of anthropology and faculty associate at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR). "There's a naïve belief that villages raise children communally, when in reality children are raised by their own families...


Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'