Quantcast

Latest Kuo-Fen Lee Stories

2014-08-07 15:39:20

Salk Institute Scientists hope to borrow strategy from simpler animals to repair damaged spinal cord nerves in humans Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is—while many animals have this ability, humans don't. But new research from the Salk Institute suggests that a small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to grow and effectively rewire circuits. Such a feat could eventually lead to therapies for the...

2013-07-26 11:40:47

'See-saw' molecule may offer clues to potential therapies in the long-term More than 11,000 Americans suffer spinal cord injuries each year, and since over a quarter of those injuries are due to falls, the number is likely to rise as the population ages. The reason so many of those injuries are permanently disabling is that the human body lacks the capacity to regenerate nerve fibers. The best our bodies can do is route the surviving tissue around the injury site. "It's like a detour...

cf1bfcdc3186d010222413418a741a451
2011-01-31 09:21:10

Among stem cell biologists there are few better-known proteins than nestin, whose very presence in an immature cell identifies it as a "stem cell," such as a neural stem cell. As helpful as this is to researchers, until now no one knew which purpose nestin serves in a cell. In a study published in the Jan. 30, 2011, advance online edition of Nature Neuroscience, Salk Institute of Biological Studies investigators led by Kuo-Fen Lee, PhD., show that nestin has reason for being in a completely...

4c1b9811efd709b68d1448b5a612e5bf1
2009-04-21 10:12:19

New research at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies casts the role of a neuronal growth factor receptor "” long suspected to facilitate the toxic effects of beta amyloid in Alzheimer's disease "” in a new light, suggesting the molecule actually protects the neuron in the periphery from beta amyloid-induced damage. The receptor molecule in question, a protein better known as p75, regulates neuronal growth, survival, and degeneration, and guides nerve fibers in growing embryos...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
Related