Quantcast

Latest La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology Stories

2014-04-11 10:56:48

In experiments with mice, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have identified an enzyme involved in the regulation of immune system T cells that could be a useful target in treating asthma and boosting the effects of certain cancer therapies. In research described online April 6 in Nature Immunology, the investigators show that mice without the enzyme SKG1 were resistant to dust mite-induced asthma. And mice with melanoma and missing the enzyme, developed far fewer lung...

2013-06-24 19:38:34

Nature-published study reveals previously unknown role of septin proteins A major study from researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology provides new revelations about the intricate pathways involved in turning on T cells, the body's most important disease-fighting cells, and was published today in the prestigious scientific journal Nature. The La Jolla Institute team is the first to prove that a certain type of protein, called septins, play a critical role in...

2013-03-13 17:52:05

La Jolla Institute and Cardiff University discovery aids efforts toward cytomegalovirus vaccine A virus most people probably have never heard of, but that the majority of us carry, is the No. 1 infectious cause of congenital birth defects in the U.S. today. Because of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection during in utero development, 1 in 750 children are born with or develop permanent disabilities such as hearing loss or brain damage. But efforts to develop a first-ever CMV vaccine are gaining...

2012-08-15 01:02:20

Researcher finds autoimmune response contributes to inflammation in the artery wall Most people probably know that heart disease remains the nation's No. 1 killer. But what many may be surprised to learn is that cholesterol has a major accomplice in causing dangerous arterial plaque buildup that can trigger a heart attack. The culprit? Inflammatory cells produced by the immune system. A number of research studies have demonstrated inflammation's role in fueling plaque buildup, also...

2012-01-12 14:39:04

JDRF's organ donation network key in research findings Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology have proven — for the first time in human tissues -- the specific immune system T cells which trigger the destruction of type 1 diabetes in the pancreas. The finding is an important advance that verifies in humans several important disease characteristics shown in mouse studies and provides a key focal point for interrupting the disease process. "This study...

2011-12-02 01:47:29

Cellular movies could greatly enhance search for Type 1 disease interventions A war is being waged in the pancreases of millions of people throughout the world. The siege leads to the development of type 1 diabetes and has been a battlefield largely hidden from view-- until now. Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology have created the first cellular movies showing the destruction underlying type 1 diabetes in real-time in mouse models. This detailed, dynamic view...

2011-10-03 15:43:51

Discovery opens up novel therapeutic avenue for autoimmune diseases Most of the time, the immune system is the body's protector, warding off invading viruses and bacteria before they can lead to infection and disease. But in autoimmune diseases, the immune system does an about face, turning on the body and attacking normal cells. A major discovery by La Jolla Institute scientist Amnon Altman, Ph.D., and his colleagues, of a previously unknown molecular interaction that is essential for...

2010-12-09 14:24:14

Team finds new software accurately predicts key information on nasal insulin treatment A La Jolla Institute team, led by leading type 1 diabetes researcher Matthias von Herrath, M.D., has demonstrated the effectiveness of a recently developed computer model in predicting key information about nasal insulin treatment regimens in type 1 (juvenile) diabetes. Development of the software, the Type 1 Diabetes PhysioLab® Platform, was funded through the peer-reviewed grant program...

ec8281fe06e492d4492138f37d14bdcb1
2009-11-17 15:09:31

Patients who have previously been infected with influenza may have adapted a certain level of immunity to the H1N1 swine flu, researchers reported Tuesday. Writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and colleagues found that people who have had flu infections or repeated flu vaccines may gain a certain protection against the swine flu. "The question we asked was, 'Is the swine flu more like the seasonal...

2009-11-16 17:08:41

Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology have found that previous influenza infections may provide at least some level of immunity to the H1N1 "swine" flu." The question we asked was, "Is the swine flu more like the seasonal flu or like a totally new strain of influenza where there would be no immunity?," said Alessandro Sette, Ph.D., an internationally recognized vaccine expert and director of the La Jolla Institute's Center for Infectious Disease. "What we have...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
Related