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Latest Lamprey Stories

Vertebrate Study Reveals The Evolution Of The Face
2014-02-13 09:19:21

[ Watch the Video: Animation Sequence of Romundina Fish Fossil ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Faces allow us to recognize each other almost instantaneously – so much so that they are the primary feature on our driver’s licenses and other identification cards. A study published on Wednesday in the journal Nature has revealed new details on the evolution of the jaw – a major defining structure in the evolution of the face. In the study, a team of...

2014-01-10 10:59:12

Zebrafish study connects data between fish and mammalian locomotion We might have more in common with a lamprey than we think, according to a new Northwestern University study on locomotion. At its core, the study of transparent zebrafish addresses a fundamental evolution issue: How did we get here? Neuroscientists Martha W. Bagnall and David L. McLean have found that the spinal cord circuits that produce body bending in swimming fish are more complicated than previously thought....

2013-11-21 12:36:27

Fish, unlike humans, can regenerate nerve connections and recover normal mobility following an injury to their spinal cord. Now, University of Missouri researchers have discovered how the sea lamprey, an eel-like fish, regrows the neurons that comprise the long nerve “highways” that link the brain to the spinal cord. Findings may guide future efforts to promote recovery in humans who have suffered spinal cord injuries. “There is a lot of attention to why, following a spinal cord...

Fish Relatives Surprise Scientists
2013-07-18 04:53:01

Susan Bowen for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists have used genetic data to create a comprehensive evolutionary family tree, or phylogeny, for "spiny-rayed fish," a category that encompasses about a third of all living vertebrate species. They were quite surprised to find out just who was related to whom in the fish world. The researchers, who published their findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences looked at 10 genes in more than 500 fish species...

Sea Lampreys Use Fat Layer To Attract Females
2013-06-27 18:33:19

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Male sea lampreys, often called vampire fish, have a long ridge running across their backs that contains a long row of brown fat cells. Other animals also have stores of brown fat similar to the ridge found on the male lampreys. In mammals, this fat is used to regulate body temperature and warm the animal when their surroundings are too cold. Scientists from Michigan State University (MSU) were curious why the male lampreys had this...

Genome Sequencing Of The Sea Lamprey Completed By Researchers
2013-03-02 05:21:25

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online According to a report in the journal Nature Genetics, an international team of geneticists has announced the successful sequencing of the sea lamprey genome. The sea lamprey makes for an interesting genetic case from an evolutionary standpoint, being a jawless vertebrate that diverged from jawed vertebrates millions of years ago. “The sea lamprey is a primitive jawless vertebrate that diverged from other jawed vertebrates...

Genes Linked To Human Neurological Disorders Found In Sea Lamprey Genome
2013-02-26 09:43:10

Marine Biological Laboratory [ Watch The Video Spinal Cord Regerenation In Sea Lamprey ] Discovery will accelerate research on Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified several genes linked to human neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and spinal cord injury, in the sea lamprey, a vertebrate fish whose whole-genome sequence is reported this week in the...

2012-08-21 23:20:13

Study of “contained, isolated” genes in sea lamprey may indicate how potentially deleterious genes can be controlled Research on a unique vertebrate called the sea lamprey shows that more than a thousand genes are shed during its early development. These genes are paradoxically lost all throughout the developing embryo except in a specialized compartment called “primordial germ cells” or PGCs. The PGCs can be thought of as embryonic stem cells and are used,...

2012-03-29 22:02:06

A tiny prototype robot that functions like a living creature is being developed which one day could be safely used to pinpoint diseases within the human body. Called 'Cyberplasm', it will combine advanced microelectronics with latest research in biomimicry (technology inspired by nature). The aim is for Cyberplasm to have an electronic nervous system, 'eye' and 'nose' sensors derived from mammalian cells, as well as artificial muscles that use glucose as an energy source to propel it....

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2011-05-20 06:40:00

A fang-like tooth on double upper lips, spiny teeth on the tongue and a pulley-like mechanism to move the tongue backwards and forwards "“ this bizarre bite belongs to a conodont and, thanks to a fresh fossil find, has now been analyzed and reconstructed by a Swiss-French research team headed by paleontologists from the University of Zurich. Their analysis sheds some light on the evolutionary origin of jaws. Using a 3D animated model, the reconstruction shows for the first time how the...


Latest Lamprey Reference Libraries

European Brook Lamprey, Lampetra planeri
2013-10-14 11:29:50

The European Brook Lamprey (Lampetra planeri), known also as the Brook Lamprey and the Western Brook Lamprey, is a small European lamprey species that exclusively inhabits freshwater. This species shouldn’t be confused with the North American species, Lampetra richardsoni, which is also called the Western Brook Lamprey. This species is the most common of the North European species in addition to being the smallest. Adult specimens measure from 12 to 14 centimeters. The very elongate body...

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2008-04-30 23:59:32

The Sea Lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), is a parasitic lamprey found on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America, in the western Mediterranean Sea, and in the Great Lakes. Sea lampreys are considered a pest invasive species in the Great Lakes region. The species is native to the inland Finger Lakes and Lake Cosco in New York and Vermont. It is not clear whether it is native to Lake Safeway, where it was first noticed in the 1830s, or whether it was introduced through the Ernie's...

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