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Latest Large igneous provinces Stories

Permian Mass Extinction May Have Happened In The Blink Of An Eye
2014-02-11 05:07:01

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Approximately 252 million years ago, the largest mass extinction event in the history of animal life on Earth occurred — wiping out more than 96 percent of marine species and 70 percent of terrestrial species. This included the largest insects known to have inhabited the planet. Scientists have explored many theories to explain the cause of the end-Permian extinction, as it came to be known. Those theories include an asteroid...

Extinction Event During End Of The Permian Period Likely Due To Acid Rain
2013-11-23 05:08:21

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online At the end of the Permian period, approximately 250 million years ago, a mass extinction occurred that was so severe it remains the most traumatic known species die-off in Earth's history. Previous research has suggested that contemporaneous volcanic eruptions in Siberia might have triggered this extinction. A new study, published in the journal Geology, reveals that the atmospheric effects of these eruptions could have been...

Megavolcanoes Led To End-Triassic Extinction Allowing Dinosaurs To Evolve
2013-03-22 04:19:11

WATCH VIDEO: [Drilling Into The Jurassic In New Jersey] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Popular theory suggests that a massive asteroid smashed into Earth around 65 million years ago wiping most life, including the dinosaurs, off the face of the earth. Now, scientists have found evidence of another planetary cataclysm that occurred some 135 million years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene Extinction (CPE) event. An examination of evidence across three continents...

Earth’s Largest Extinction Event - Was It Caused By Siberian Volcanism?
2012-01-10 05:57:28

Around 250 million years ago, at the end of the Permian geologic period, there was a mass extinction so severe that it remains the most traumatic known species die-off in Earth´s history. Although the cause of this event is a mystery, it has been speculated that the eruption of a large swath of volcanic rock in Russia called the Siberian Traps was a trigger for the extinction. New research from Carnegie´s Linda Elkins-Tanton and her co-authors offers insight into how this volcanism...

2007-11-05 12:00:16

A U.S. study suggests violent volcanic eruptions in India might have killed the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, not a meteor impact. The eruptions created India's gigantic Deccan Traps lava beds and the research by Princeton University paleontologist Gerta Keller marks the first time a study has directly linked the main phase of the Deccan Traps' creation to the mass extinction. Keller said she made the linkage using microscopic marine fossils that are known to have evolved immediately...

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2006-03-09 09:00:52

University scientists suggest extraterrestrial theories are flawed and that more down to earth factors could have accounted for past mass extinctions Leicester -- Earth history has been punctuated by several mass extinctions rapidly wiping out nearly all life forms on our planet. What causes these catastrophic events? Are they really due to meteorite impacts? Current research suggests that the cause may come from within our own planet "“ the eruption of vast amounts of lava that brings...

2005-08-10 00:39:41

New discoveries about the timing and speed of gigantic, 6500-foot (2-km) thick lava flows that poured out of the ground 65 million years ago could shift the blame for killing the dinos. The Deccan Traps of India are one of Earth's largest lava flows ever, with the potential of having wreaked havoc with the climate of the Earth - if they erupted and released climate-changing gases quickly enough. French and Indian geologists have now identified a 600-meter (2000-foot) thick portion of the...


Latest Large igneous provinces Reference Libraries

Columbia Plateau
2013-04-19 16:35:47

The Columbia Plateau ecoregion is a Level III ecoregion designed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington, with little areas over the Washington state border in Idaho. This ecoregion stretches across a wide swath of the Columbia River Basin from the Dalles, Oregon to Lewiston, Idaho to Okanogan, Washington near the Canadian border. It incorporates nearly 500 miles of the Columbia River, as well as the lower reaches of major tributaries....

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'