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Latest Laughter Stories

2008-07-28 06:00:00

THE QUESTION of whether laughter really is the best medicine is set to be answered at this year's Fringe. Comedian John Ryan has convinced a group of nurses to carry out health checks on the best stand-ups in the land. They will then try to assess whether their constant laughter has helped them to remain healthier than the average person, with one to be crowned Edinburgh's healthiest comedian. The health checks will be validated by health service representatives, and among the volunteers...

2008-07-22 12:00:47

Play 99.6 in Collaboration with Petra Aluminum Presents Dean Obeidallah and Maysoon Zayid in a Live Comedy Performance The Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has traditionally welcomed original cultural events from across the globe. On August 11th and 12th, Play 99.6 continues that proud tradition by hosting the comedic duo Dean Obeidallah and Maysoon Zayid at The Courtyard in the Al-Qasr Metropole Hotel. In collaboration with Petra Aluminum and co- sponsors Al Qasr Metropole Hotel, the duo will...

2008-07-09 15:00:10

A British science writer says he has determined humor is just the recognition of a pattern that a person finds surprising. Humor occurs when the brain recognizes a pattern that surprises it and that recognition of this sort is rewarded with the experience of the humorous response, an element of which is broadcast as laughter, said researcher and theorist Alastair Clarke. It is not the content of the stimulus but the patterns underlying it, that provide the potential for sources of humor....

2007-05-01 06:00:13

By Chinery, Winifred KEYWORDS Alleviation, Humour, Operating theatre, Stress The use of humour was reviewed to establish whether it could be used constructively to reduce work-related stress within the perioperative environment. It is clear from the review that further research is required in order to gain a better understanding of the concept of humour and its uses in healthcare and it is hoped that this review will contribute towards the increasing body of knowledge in this field....

2006-01-20 11:15:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK -- Sitting through a funny movie seems to be as good for your heart as running through the park, a small study suggests. In an experiment with 20 healthy young adults, researchers found that participants' blood flow improved when they watched a movie that made them laugh. In fact, the circulation boost was similar to what's been seen with aerobic exercise, according to findings published in the February issue of the medical journal Heart. However, that doesn't mean...

2005-11-22 16:40:00

In an important new study from the forthcoming Quarterly Review of Biology, biologists from Binghamton University explore the evolution of two distinct types of laughter "“ laughter which is stimulus-driven and laughter which is self-generated and strategic. "Laughter that occurs during everyday social interaction in response to banal comments and humorless conversation is now being studied," write Matthew Gervais and David Sloan Wilson. "The unstated issue is whether such laughter is...

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2005-03-08 08:04:32

Blood flow increases when folks watch funny movies, study finds HealthDay News -- A good belly laugh may have repercussions all the way up to the heart. For the first time, researchers have found that laughter causes the endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessels, to dilate. This increases blood flow which, of course, is good for overall cardiovascular health. The message is clear, and economical. "I think it would be reasonable for everybody to loosen up, and spend about 15 to 20 minutes...

2004-11-29 09:00:08

PITTSBURGH - Imagine being denied a passport for, of all things, your teeth. It could happen, but not because they're crooked. Under new rules for visa photographs that began this summer, the State Department doesn't want to see them at all, according to a story published in Sunday's Pittsburgh-Post Gazette. The new guidelines permit people to smile for passport and visa pictures but frown on toothy smiles, which apparently are classified as unusual or unnatural expressions. "The subject's...


Word of the Day
tessitura
  • The prevailing range of a vocal or instrumental part, within which most of the tones lie.
This word is Italian in origin and comes from the Latin 'textura,' web, structure.