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Latest Leaf-nosed bat Stories

Scientists Describe Two New Species Of Yellow-shouldered Bats
2014-04-17 13:35:01

Lying forgotten in museum collections two new species of yellow-shouldered bats have been unearthed by scientists at the American Museum of New York and The Field Museum of Natural History and described in the open access journal ZooKeys.

Engineering Plus Evolutionary Analyses Used To Answer Natural Selection Questions
2014-01-24 14:45:08

Introducing a new approach that combines evolutionary and engineering analyses to identify the targets of natural selection

Evolutionary Biologists Discover How Species Evolve
2011-11-24 04:17:40

'This study conducted during the International Year of the Bat offers a clear example of how the evolution of new traits, in this case a skull with a new shape, allowed animals to use new resources and eventually, to rapidly evolve into many new species'

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2008-12-12 12:34:55

Annemarie Surlykke from the University of Southern Denmark is fascinated by echolocation.


Latest Leaf-nosed bat Reference Libraries

Lesser Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae
2013-08-19 15:45:14

The lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat or more commonly as Sanborn’s long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in a different areas depending upon the season. Its summer range includes southern portions of Arizona, California, and New Mexico and a yearly range in southern and eastern portions of Mexico and coasts of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.  This species prefers a habitat within scrublands,...

Greater Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris nivalis
2013-08-19 15:40:45

The greater long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), also known as the Mexican long-nosed bat, is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States. It prefers a habitat within temperate forests or desert scrublands. The greater long-nosed bat migrates seasonally to different areas of is range, most likely due to weather patterns and food abundance. In Mexico, the greater long-nosed bat roosts in male and female colonies, but during midsummer, after...

Southern Long Nosed Bat, Leptonycteris curasoae
2013-08-19 15:20:27

The southern long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to South America. It holds a range that includes Venezuela, Colombia, and the islands of Curaçao, Aruba, and Bonaire. It prefers a habitat within arid or semiarid climates along coastlines or in scrublands and thorn forests. The Curacao population was once thought to be a subspecies but is now classified as a population along with other populations of the species. The southern long-nosed bat...

Great Fruit-Eating Bat, Artibeus lituratus
2013-06-27 12:20:08

The great fruit-eating bat (Artibeus lituratus) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that can be found in Central and South America. Its range extends from Brazil and Argentina to Mexico and includes Barbados, Grenada, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago, among other areas. It prefers a habitat in forests and other natural areas. It can reach an average body length of 2.2 ounces. This species has a stable population, although it is slightly threatened by habitat destruction due to deforestation....

Long-Snouted Bat, Platalina genovensium
2013-06-25 13:02:53

The long-snouted bat (Platalina genovensium) is a species of leaf-nosed bat that is native to Peru. It is known to roost in caves, bridges, and man made structures. This species is known to feed on nectar and pollen, but will consume cactus flowers when in bloom. There is not much known about the habits of this species, but it is thought to be pregnant during the month of September. The long-snouted bat is threatened by habitat loss, which affects its habitat and its food sources, although...

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Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.