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Latest Leaf vegetables Stories

2010-09-20 10:00:00

FELLSMERE, Fla., Sept. 20 /PRNewswire/ -- Watercress, the super food, is now watercress the breast cancer preventive according to a study released yesterday in The British Journal of Nutrition conducted by the Cancer Research Centre at the School of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital in the United Kingdom. In experimental findings the consumption of a 3 ounce portion of watercress by healthy participants who had previously been treated for breast cancer reduced the presence of a key...

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2010-03-03 11:18:22

Far from being a food spoiler, the fluorescent lighting in supermarkets actually can boost the nutritional value of fresh spinach, scientists are reporting. The finding could lead to improved ways of preserving and enhancing the nutritional value of spinach and perhaps other veggies, they suggest in a study in ACS' bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Gene Lester, Donald J. Makus, and D. Mark Hodges note that fresh spinach is a nutritional powerhouse, packed with vitamin C,...

2009-11-25 07:26:00

NEW YORK, Nov. 25 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Special Research on Vegetable Seed Market of China in 2009 http://www.reportlinker.com/p0165564/Special-Research-on-Vegetable-Seed-Market-of-China-in-2009.html As the primary component of planting cost, seeds are at the upstream of the industry of produce, and competitiveness of the seed market decides the initiative of competition in agriculture. China is a big...

2009-11-12 17:34:00

LOVES PARK, Ill., Nov. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- The Rachael Ray Show fans across the United States will discover the great taste and crunch of one of the hottest selling, new cracker brands in the U.S. A testament to the great taste, incredible health benefits, and superior quality of the product, Crunchmaster® Multi-Seed Crackers are being featured on Rachael Ray's daytime talk show as Rachael's Snack of the Day on November 13, 2009. For their snacking pleasure, audience...

2009-11-04 14:34:10

Research points to pumped up lutein levels in broccoli Carotenoids"”fat-soluble plant compounds found in some vegetables"”are essential to the human diet and reportedly offer important health benefits to consumers. Plant carotenoids are the most important source of vitamin A in the human diet; the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin, found in corn and leafy greens vegetable such as kale, broccoli, and spinach, are widely considered to be valuable antioxidants capable of protecting...

2009-09-08 13:13:41

Researchers compare rapid potentiometric, colorimetric methods Leafy green vegetables such as lettuce, Asian greens, and spinach can accumulate high concentrations of nitrate"“nitrogen (NO3-N), which are potentially harmful if consumed by humans. To measure NO3-N concentration in plant tissue, many laboratories use ion selective electrodes (ISEs). Relatively inexpensive and portable ISE nutrient monitoring devices, including the Cardy NO3-N meter, are widely used to measure fresh plant...

2009-09-08 08:57:31

Mulched maple and oak leaves reduce dandelions in established Kentucky bluegrass Spring and summer often find homeowners out in their yards, busily attempting to control the onslaught of dandelions in a quest for green, weed-free lawns. Dandelions, broadleaf perennial plants that have a questionable reputation as lawn wreckers, can make even the most patient gardener reach for chemical weed killers to control the onslaught of the ubiquitous weeds. Now, the answer to an environmentally...

2009-09-02 08:34:38

U.S. scientists have discovered the invasive garlic mustard plant, over time, loses its primary weapon -- a fungus-killing toxin it injects into the soil. University of Illinois scientists said their study is one of the first to show evolutionary forces can alter the very attributes that give an invasive plant its advantage. Garlic mustard plants are part of the family that includes cabbage and horseradish -- plants that rely on soil fungi for phosphorous, nitrogen and water. For whatever...

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2009-09-01 12:15:00

Like most invasive plants introduced to the U.S. from Europe and other places, garlic mustard first found it easy to dominate the natives. A new study indicates that eventually, however, its primary weapon "“ a fungus-killing toxin injected into the soil "“ becomes less potent.The study, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is one of the first to show that evolutionary forces can alter the very attributes that give an invasive plant its advantage. In fact, the study...

2009-08-26 07:30:00

NAPLES, Fla., Aug. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- Most people might think of nettle as simply a common and aggressive weed that can sting and cause skin irritation. But nettle has also been used for hundreds of years to treat seasonal allergies and other inflammatory diseases, although the precise nature of its anti-inflammatory effect was unknown. Now, scientists with HerbalScience have identified specific bioactives in nettle leaf extracts that inhibit in vitro receptors and enzymes known to be key...


Latest Leaf vegetables Reference Libraries

Leaf vegetables
2013-08-21 09:03:22

Leaf vegetables are leaves from various plants that are edible with some leaves having tender shoots, such as beet greens, attached. Leaf vegetables are very high in nutrition and may be used in various culinary dishes. While there are over a thousand species of leaf vegetables, they generally come from plants that are short-lived such as lettuce and spinach. Leaf vegetables are high in vitamin K which is caused from the photosynthesis that takes place during the growing phase. Anyone on...

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2009-04-28 21:04:39

The Plutella xylostella is often referred to as the Diamondback or Cabbage moth. This species is has a brief lifespan of only 14 days and is thought to have originated in the Mediterranean region of Europe, but has since dispersed across the world. This species is capable of reproducing quickly and can travel great distances. Diamondback are considered serious pests in warmer climates when the absence of a harsh winter prevents their eggs from being destroyed. The moths are resistant to...

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2009-04-28 15:40:33

Brassica tournefortii is a species of mustard plant that is more commonly known as Asian, African and Sahara mustard. It is very similar to other mustard species blooming annually with long stems reaching just over 3 feet in length, but the flowers are a duller yellow. Indigenous to North Africa and the Middle East, this species was transported accidentally to the United States by humans. It grows abundantly in the Sonoran and Mojave Deserts and in hot valleys of southern California....

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2009-04-28 15:37:54

Brassica rapa or Turnip Mustard is grown primarily as a leaf vegetable, root vegetable and an oilseed and is often referred to as a field mustard. Napa cabbage and turnip are members of this group. Varieties of this plant are used in experiments because they are easy to grow and require little attention and reach full maturity in 40 days. Some have even been used in botany experiments in space. Photo Copyright and Credit

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2009-04-28 15:35:18

Brassica oleracea is indigenous to the coastal areas of southern and western Europe and is often referred to as Wild Mustard. It is tolerant of salt and lime in the soil of its native lands. The plant grows tall and blooms biennially. Large sturdy leaves act as water storage. Once the plant is two years old a tall stem measuring 3 - 7 feet in height grows bearing a cluster of yellow flowers. This plant is flush with nutrients like vitamin C. Cultivars of this plant are categorized into...

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Word of the Day
ween
  • To think; to imagine; to fancy.
  • To be of opinion; have the notion; think; imagine; suppose.
The word 'ween' comes from Middle English wene, from Old English wēn, wēna ("hope, weening, expectation"), from Proto-Germanic *wēniz, *wēnōn (“hope, expectation”), from Proto-Indo-European *wen- (“to strive, love, want, reach, win”).
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