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Leaf vegetables Reference Libraries

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Leaf vegetables
2013-08-21 09:03:22

Leaf vegetables are leaves from various plants that are edible with some leaves having tender shoots, such as beet greens, attached. Leaf vegetables are very high in nutrition and may be used in various culinary dishes. While there are over a thousand species of leaf vegetables, they generally come from plants that are short-lived such as lettuce and spinach. Leaf vegetables are high in...

Diamondback Moth
2009-04-28 21:04:39

The Plutella xylostella is often referred to as the Diamondback or Cabbage moth. This species is has a brief lifespan of only 14 days and is thought to have originated in the Mediterranean region of Europe, but has since dispersed across the world. This species is capable of reproducing quickly and can travel great distances. Diamondback are considered serious pests in warmer climates when...

Sahara Mustard Brassica tournefortii
2009-04-28 15:40:33

Brassica tournefortii is a species of mustard plant that is more commonly known as Asian, African and Sahara mustard. It is very similar to other mustard species blooming annually with long stems reaching just over 3 feet in length, but the flowers are a duller yellow. Indigenous to North Africa and the Middle East, this species was transported accidentally to the United States by humans. It...

Turnip Mustard Brassica rapa
2009-04-28 15:37:54

Brassica rapa or Turnip Mustard is grown primarily as a leaf vegetable, root vegetable and an oilseed and is often referred to as a field mustard. Napa cabbage and turnip are members of this group. Varieties of this plant are used in experiments because they are easy to grow and require little attention and reach full maturity in 40 days. Some have even been used in botany experiments in...

Wild Mustard Brassica oleracea
2009-04-28 15:35:18

Brassica oleracea is indigenous to the coastal areas of southern and western Europe and is often referred to as Wild Mustard. It is tolerant of salt and lime in the soil of its native lands. The plant grows tall and blooms biennially. Large sturdy leaves act as water storage. Once the plant is two years old a tall stem measuring 3 - 7 feet in height grows bearing a cluster of yellow...

Bittercress Barbarea vulgaris
2009-04-23 11:07:34

Bittercress (Barbarea vulgaris), also commonly known as Herb Barbara, Rocketcress, Yellow Rocketcress, Winter Rocket, and Wound Rocket, is a European biennial herb. This plant displays a rosette of shiny, dark green leaves at the base and additional pinnately divided leaves on the stem. In the spring, yellow flowers originate in tightly packed terminal groups just above the foliage....

Chrysanthemum more commonly known as the mum
2005-07-12 18:53:31

The chrysanthemum (more commonly known as the mum) is a flowering perennial plant of the genus Chrysanthemum in the daisy family (Asteraceae). The genus has been split into several genera, such as Dendranthema, Leucanthemum and Tanacetum. But there is a growing consensus to merge back Dendranthema into Chrysanthemum. Historically, chrysanthemums were cultivated in China as a flowering...

Daylily
2005-07-12 16:47:45

Daylily comprises the small genus Hemerocallis of flowering plants in the family Hemerocallidaceae. The name Hemerocallis is based on the Greek words for day and beauty, which reflects the fact that the individual flowers last for only one day. They open at sunrise and wither at sunset, to be replaced by another one (sometimes two or none) on the same stem the next day. Originally from...

Cockscomb Celosia
2005-07-12 10:26:47

The cockscombs are edible and ornamental plants named for their brightly colored flower heads, comprising the genus Celosia of the family Amaranthaceae (subfamily Amaranthoideae). They are similar in appearance and uses to the amaranths. Silver cockscomb is grown as a leaf vegetable and pseudo-cereal, especially in West and Central Africa and Southeast Asia. It is also the most important...

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bibliopole
  • A bookseller; now, especially, a dealer in rare and curious books.
This word comes from a Greek phrase meaning 'book seller.'
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