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Latest learning disabilities Stories

2008-08-03 03:00:23

By Mandell, David S Eleey, Catharine C; Cederbaum, Julie A; Noll, Elizabeth; Hutchinson, M Katherine; Jemmott, Loretta S; Blank, Michael B ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: To estimate the relative risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among children identified as having learning disabilities through the special education system. METHODS: This cross-sectional study used special education data and Medicaid data from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for calendar year 2002. The sample comprised...

2008-07-30 00:00:40

LEADING ARTICLE Shameful neglect of disabled patients reflects wider attitudes In the great, swirling debate about reform of the British health system, the dangers of creating a "two-tier" service in which the rich and the poor enjoy different standards of treatment is a recurring theme. Yet the reality is that we already tolerate a two- tier service; except that the divide is not between the rich and the poor, but between the majority of patients and the mentally disabled. A Disability...

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2008-04-09 11:50:00

Chinese scientists reported results of a study that found dyslexia affects different parts of the brain in children, depending on whether they learned to read English or Chinese. The findings could have implications for treatment of dyslexic children, and suggest that therapists may need to use different methods to assist those from different cultures."This finding was very surprising to us. We had not ever thought that dyslexics' brains are different for children who read in English and...

2007-09-21 06:00:28

By Graham, Lorraine Bellert, Anne; Thomas, Jenny; Pegg, John Abstract QuickSmart is a basic academic skills intervention designed for persistently low-achieving students in the middle years of schooling that aims to improve the automaticity of basic skills to improve higher-order processes, such as problem solving and comprehension, as measured on standardized tests. The QuickSmart instructional program consists of three structured, teacher- or teacher aide-directed, 30-minute, small-group...

2005-11-07 13:44:50

In a surprise twist that recalls the film classic "Flowers for Algernon," but adds a happy ending, UCLA scientists used statins, a popular class of cholesterol drugs, to reverse the attention deficits linked to the leading genetic cause of learning disabilities. The Nov. 8 issue of Current Biology reports the findings, which were studied in mice bred to develop the disease, called neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1). The results proved so hopeful, that the Food and Drug Administration approved the use...

2005-11-07 13:40:09

This week, researchers report evidence that a statin drug already shown to be safe for use in humans has proven effective at correcting cell-cell communication and curing learning disfunction in a mouse model of Neurofibromatosis type I, a human genetic disorder that causes learning disabilities in millions of people worldwide. Learning disabilities affect 5% of the world's population, have a profound impact on countless lives, and cost billions of dollars, but there is little or nothing...

2005-10-28 13:39:27

Pediatric researchers at Yale School of Medicine have identified a gene on human chromosome 6 called DCDC2, which is linked to dyslexia, a reading disability affecting millions of children and adults. The researchers also found that a genetic alteration in DCDC2 leads to a disruption in the formation of brain circuits that make it possible to read. This genetic alteration is transmitted within families. "These promising results now have the potential to lead to improved diagnostic methods...

2005-09-02 13:58:42

LONDON (Reuters) - A British professor sparked a row on Friday by saying that dyslexia - a condition that affects millions of people worldwide -- was overdiagnosed. Julian Elliott, professor of education at Durham University in northern England, described dyslexia as a "construct" that had no scientific basis but had gained wide currency. "It is hardly surprising that the widespread, yet wholly erroneous, belief that dyslexics are intellectually bright but poor readers would create...

2005-05-29 23:10:00

MADISON - Addressing a persistent debate in the field of dyslexia research, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Southern California (USC) have disproved the popular theory that deficits in certain visual processes cause the spelling and reading woes commonly suffered by dyslexics. Rather, a more general problem in basic sensory perception may be at the root of the learning disorder, the scientists report today (May 29, 2005) in the journal Nature...

2005-06-03 19:53:01

The dyslexic brain may have a general problem forming perceptual categories, including the templates for printed letters and speech sounds, say USC neuroscientists. This is reflected in a reduced ability to filter out visual "noise" that can obscure a pattern, the researchers suggest. Their novel hypothesis, published in the current issue of Nature Neuroscience, raises broader questions: Does the dyslexic brain's trouble with patterns and noise extend to other senses? Does poor filtering...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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