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Latest Leber's Congenital Amaurosis Stories

Researcher Reveals Novel Treatment For A Form Of Childhood Blindness
2014-07-14 03:18:37

McGill University Health Centre An international research project, led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal, reports that a new oral medication is showing significant progress in restoring vision to patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Until now, this inherited retinal disease that causes visual impairment ranging from reduced vision to complete blindness, has remained untreatable. The study is published today in the scientific...

2013-06-13 10:02:38

Engineered virus will improve gene therapy for blinding eye diseases Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed an easier and more effective method for inserting genes into eye cells that could greatly expand gene therapy to help restore sight to patients with blinding diseases ranging from inherited defects like retinitis pigmentosa to degenerative illnesses of old age, such as macular degeneration. Unlike current treatments, the new procedure — which...

2012-07-30 13:45:09

A five-country international team, led by Casey Eye Institute Molecular Diagnostic laboratory, BGI and Zhejiang University School of Medicine First Affiliated Hospital identified the NMNAT1 mutations as a cause of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in children. The latest study was published online in Nature Genetics, reporting the genetic characteristics underlying some LCA patients, and providing important evidences that support NMNAT1 as...

2012-07-30 12:53:15

Researchers from the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Division and their collaborators have isolated an elusive human gene that causes a common form of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a relatively rare but devastating form of early-onset blindness. The new LCA gene is called NMNAT1. Finding the specific gene mutated in patients with LCA is the first step towards developing sight-saving gene therapy....

Image 1 - Gene Therapy For Inherited Blindness Succeeds In Patients' Other Eye
2012-02-10 04:53:45

In 3 Adults, Repeat Dose Safely Improves Vision Gene therapy for congenital blindness has taken another step forward, as researchers further improved vision in three adult patients previously treated in one eye. After receiving the same treatment in their other eye, the patients became better able to see in dim light, and two were able to navigate obstacles in low-light situations. No adverse effects occurred. Neither the first treatment nor the readministered treatment triggered an...

Gene Therapy May Improve Some Forms Of Blindness
2011-10-28 09:45:12

A UK man is being treated for the progressive genetic disorder, choroideraemia, in an attempt to reverse his blindness. Jonathan Wyatt was able to see normally until about the age of 19 when he began having problems seeing in the dark. He was told by doctors that his vision would get progressively worse until eventually going blind, reports BBC News. Poor eyesight didn´t stop Wyatt, now 63 years old, from a career as a barrister but 10 years ago he found himself having difficulty...

2011-05-10 12:02:00

- Hematologist and Gene Therapy Expert at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Joins an Elite Honorary Society - PHILADELPHIA, May 10, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Katherine A. High, M.D., a gene therapy expert at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, has been elected to the 2011 class of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. The Academy is one of the nation's most prestigious honorary societies and is a leading center for independent policy research. Dr. High joins a...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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