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Latest Leinster Stories

2014-01-16 08:25:04

LONDON, January 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Millie Mackintosh, former star of the hit TV series Made in Chelsea, hit the streets of Dublin to celebrate New Year's Eve. Invited by Tourism Ireland in London, Millie checked out some of the city's great shopping, venues, visitor attractions and restaurants - which make Dublin such a great choice for a city break. Over two days, Millie took in venues like the Sugar Club, enjoyed some of the great shopping on South William...

2008-09-26 09:00:30

DUBLIN, Ireland, Sept. 26, 2008 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Market Headquarters announces audio interview with Mr. Emmett O'Connell, Chairman and CEO of Great Western Mining Corporation (GWMC), who discusses the company's current projects and overall progress in the current market. Mr. O'Connell speaks about the company's current interests and progressions, as well as their overall goal. He also talks about the company's recognition in winning the best resource stock on the PLUS market. The audio...

2008-09-06 18:00:16

LEGENDARY crooner Red Hurley is finally off the market. The showbands star tied the knot with gorgeous fiancee Norma Breen yesterday afternoon. The blushing bride looked beautiful in white as the happy couple posed for pictures outside All Saints Church, Raheny, Co Dublin. (c) 2008 Daily Mirror. Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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