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Latest Lemuroidea Stories

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2008-07-22 14:30:00

Experts on Tuesday said the discovery of 30-40 endangered greater bamboo lemurs living far outside the only other area they were known to exist has renewed hope for the survival of the species. They were found in the Torotorofotsy wetlands of east central Madagascar, more than 400 km (240 miles) north of the isolated pockets of bamboo forest where the rest of the known populations of the species live. Edward Louis, a U.S. conservation geneticist who coordinated the joint research, said...

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2008-03-19 18:10:00

Analysis of the first hand bones belonging to an ancient lemur has revealed a mysterious joint structure that has scientists puzzled.Pierre Lemelin, an assistant professor of anatomy at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and a team of fellow American researchers have analyzed the first hand bones ever found of Hadropithecus stenognathus, a lemur that lived 2,000 years ago. The bones were discovered in 2003 in a cave in southeastern Madagascar, an island nation off the coast of...


Latest Lemuroidea Reference Libraries

Randrianasolo's Sportive Lemur, Lepilemur randrianasoloi
2012-08-08 09:32:17

Randrianasolo's sportive lemur (Lepilemur randrianasoloi) is also known as Bemaraha sportive lemur, and is native to western areas of Madagascar. The full extent of its range is not yet known, because this species is one of fifteen described in 2006, so more research is needed to define the boundaries of its range. It occurs in dry deciduous forests. Randrianasolo's sportive lemur can reach an average body length of up to 1.8 feet, including the tail. Because this lemur has only recently...

Weasel Sportive Lemur, Lepilemur mustelinus
2012-08-02 20:43:55

The weasel sportive lemur (Lepilemur mustelinus) is native to the island of Madagascar. Its other common names include the weasel lemur, the greater weasel lemur, and the greater sportive lemur. It prefers a habitat within rainforests or tropical rainforests. Its fur is red-brown on the back and grey-brown on the underbelly. It can reach an average body length of up to fourteen inches with a tail length of between ten to twelve inches. Groups of this species are small, consisting of a...

Sanford's Brown Lemur, Eulemur sanfordi
2012-08-02 20:40:16

Sanford’s brown lemur (Eulemur sanfordi), also known as Sanford’s lemur, is native to the island of Madagascar. Its range extends from Antsiranana to Ampanakana. There are populations located in several forests including Analamerana and Ankarana, a fragmented population in Daraina. Although its southern range stops at the Manambato River, hybrids of the white-fronted brown lemur and Sanford’s brown lemur occur between Sambava and Vohemar. Preferred habitats include montane, arid...

Small-toothed Sportive Lemur, Lepilemur microdon
2012-06-14 17:15:27

The small-toothed sportive lemur (Lepilemur microdon) is also known as the small-toothed weasel lemur, and is native only to the island of Madagascar. It range extends from the Ranomafana National Park to Andringitra National Park in the southwest. It is thought that the Manampatrana River marks the southern border of this range, and that the Namorona River marks the north. It is thought that James' sportive lemur replaces the small-toothed sportive lemur in its far southern range. It prefers...

Lac Alaotra Bamboo Lemur, Hapalemur alaotrensis
2012-06-11 11:59:38

The Lac Alaotra bamboo lemur (Hapalemur alaotrensis) is native only to the island of Madagascar. Its other common names include the Alaotran bamboo lemur, Alaotran gentle lemur, and the Lac Alaotra gentle lemur, and its local name is the bandro. It lives in a small range comprised of the area in and around the reed beds of Lac Alaotra in northeast Madagascar. The Lac Alaotra bamboo lemur is small, reaching an average body length of up to 1.3 feet and a weight of up to three pounds. The...

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Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'karpos', fruit.
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