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Latest Leopard Seal Stories

Adelies Ross Sea ice floes
2014-02-27 05:21:14

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The Ross Sea is a major, biologically productive ecosystem in the Antarctic, which "clearly will be extensively modified by future climate change" in the coming decades as longer periods of ice-free open water are created by rising temperatures and changing wind patterns. According to a new paper funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), these ice-free periods affect the life cycles of both predators and prey. The research...

Penguins Budget Their Time Wisely By Using Sea Ice To Rest
2012-11-22 12:22:00

[ Video 1 ] [ Video 2 ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers tracking the behavior of emperor penguins near the sea have identified the importance of sea ice for their feeding habits. The team wrote in the journal PLOS ONE about the emperor penguins foraging behavior through the birds' chick-rearing season. Emperor penguins spend more time than other penguins diving for food, and only use about 30 percent of their time at sea to take short breaks to rest...


Latest Leopard Seal Reference Libraries

Ross Seal, Ommatophoca rossii
2013-01-01 15:44:30

The Ross seal (Ommatophoca rossii) is a true seal in the Phocidae family, and can only be found on pack ice in Antarctica. This species was formally described by James Clark Ross in 1841, during his British Antarctic Expedition. It is very uncommon to see in its range and rarely leaves the pack ice, with stray individuals occurring off southeast Australia or sub-Antarctic islands. The Ross seal can reach an average length between 5.5 and 6.9 feet, although some females can reach up to 8.2...

Weddell Seal, Leptonychotes weddellii
2012-06-27 21:35:24

The Weddell seal (Leptonychotes weddellii) is a large true seal in the Lobodontini tribe. It is native to Antarctica, with its range consisting of a large “ring” that surrounds Antarctica. This seal will spend most of its time in the water instead of on land. The Weddell seal appears on the IUCN Red List with a conservation status of “Least Concern”.  It is estimated this seal numbers over 800,000 individuals in the wild. First discovered in 1820s by a British sealing captain...

Crabeater Seal, Lobodon carcinophagus
2012-06-26 14:40:11

The crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophagus) is a true seal that can be found around the whole of Antarctica. Its range also includes small areas in South America, New Zealand, Africa, and Australia. It resides on the pack ice zone for the entire year, even as it shifts seasonally, and prefers to stay in the continental shelf area in water with a depth of less than 1,968 feet. Because the populations are so wide spread and are sufficiently mixed, there have been no subspecies found. Because...

42_cadf0c2f100c51c0c52fd74946c9701b
2007-08-10 17:31:37

The Leopard Seal (Hydrurga leptonyx), belongs to the seal family Phocidae. It is the only species in its genus. Leopard Seals are the second largest species of seal in the Antarctic (after Southern Elephant Seals), and are near the top of the Antarctic food chain. Orcas are the only natural predators of Leopard Seals. They can live twenty-six years, possibly more. Leopard seals are large and muscular, with dark grey backs and light grey stomachs. Their throats are whitish with the black...

38_bee1e811c596d2ca273f34a65d5bde80
2006-02-17 17:23:31

The Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) is easily identifiable by the wide white stripe extending like a bonnet across the top of its head. Chicks have grey backs with white fronts. Adult Gentoos reach a height of 75 to 90 cm. They are considered to be the fastest underwater swimming penguins and can reach speeds of up to 36 km/h. Two sub-species of this penguin are recognized Pygoscelis papua papua and the smaller Pygoscelis papua ellsworthii. Males have a maximum weight of about 8...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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