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Latest Leporidae Stories

2008-03-24 01:56:49

Just in time for Easter, the oldest rabbit relation is bounding onto the scientific scene. Tiny foot bones from a 53 million-year-old rabbit ancestor represent the oldest known record of hippity-hoppity mammals and their closest evolutionary relations, according to a new study. The ankle and heel bones were discovered in a coal mine in Gujarat, in west-central India, and recently found by a team of paleontologists to belong to the Lagomorpha, a classification of mammals that...

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2008-03-20 00:20:00

One day last spring, fossil hunter and anatomy professor Kenneth Rose, Ph.D. was displaying the bones of a jackrabbit's foot as part of a seminar at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine when something about the shape of the bones looked oddly familiar.That unanticipated eureka moment has led researchers at the school to the discovery of the oldest known record of rabbits. The fossil evidence in hand, found in west-central India, predates the oldest previously known rabbits by...


Latest Leporidae Reference Libraries

Alaskan Hare, Lepus othus
2014-05-19 10:40:26

The Alaskan hare (Lepus othus), or the tundra hare, can be found on the Alaskan Peninsula and in western areas of Alaska. This species prefers to reside in rocky areas in their tundra habitat, resting in open areas rather than in burrows. It is most closely related to the mountain hare and the Arctic hare. Members of this species reach an average weight between 1.6 and 2.2 feet, with hind feet that reach a length of 7.9 inches. The hind feet are thought to help the hares move quickly and...

Chinese Hare, Lepus sinensis
2014-04-25 10:15:41

The Chinese hare (Lepus sinensis) is a species of hare that can be found in Vietnam, China, and Taiwan. Its range includes the Chinese provinces of Anhui, Hunan, and Zhejiang. This species was first described in 1832 by John Edward Gray and was once thought to hold a subspecies known as the Korean hare, but this was later found to be a distinct species. The Chinese hare reaches an average body length between 16 and 30 inches and a weight of up to 4.3 pounds, with females growing...

Tapeti, Sylvilagus brasiliensis
2012-07-05 09:48:08

The tapeti (Sylvilagus brasiliensis) is a species of cottontail rabbit that can be found in Central and North America. Its other common names include the forest rabbit and the Brazilian rabbit. It is the only species in the Leporidae family found in the majority of its range. The tapeti is nocturnal and is a solitary creature. It can be seen foraging for browse and grass in forested regions, in human populated areas such as gardens and plantations, and near swamps and riverbeds. The tapeti...

White-sided Jackrabbit, Lepus callotis
2012-04-27 08:34:55

The white-sided jackrabbit (Lepus callotis) has a limited range extending from northwestern and central Mexico to southern New Mexico in the United States. This rabbit is also called the Mexican Hare. There are two subspecies of the white-sided jackrabbit. It prefers a habitat at high elevations, living in open plains and on plateaus.  This rabbit will not live where there are mountains or hills, and will also avoid areas where trees and shrubs are dominate. The body length of this rabbit...

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2008-06-16 16:02:21

The Scrub Hare (Lepus saxatilis), is a species of hare found in South Africa, parts of central Africa, and Namibia. It is found at about 3200 to 6500 feet above sea level. Its dorsal fur is gray and black, while its ventral fur is white. It has a black and white tail, while it has lighter fur around its face. Its length varies from 17.5 to 25 inches, and it weighs 3.5 to 10 pounds. Females are typically larger than males. The average mass at birth is 4 ounces. Parental care is low and...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.