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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 13:20 EDT

Latest Leslie Leinwand Stories

2011-10-31 05:56:52

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- If you have a fear of snakes, hopefully this will change your mind!  According to a recent study, fatty acids circulating through feeding python bloodstreams promote healthy heart growth in the constricting snake and the results may have implications for treating human heart disease. University of Colorado Boulder Professor Leslie Leinwand and her research team found the amount of triglycerides, the main constituent of natural fats and oils, in the blood of...

Pythons’ Huge Hearts Offer Insight For Human Heart Health
2011-10-28 05:34:09

While many people think of snakes as creepy, cold-hearted creatures that swallow their prey whole. But it turns out the reptiles actually have enormous hearts that could offer clues to treating people with cardiac disease, researchers from the University of Colorado-Boulder reported on Thursday. The surprising new study showed that the vast amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding Burmese pythons promote healthy heart growth. The researchers found the amount of...

2011-10-27 22:06:29

Fatty acids circulating through feeding python bloodstreams promotes healthy heart growth in the constricting snakes A surprising new University of Colorado Boulder study shows that huge amounts of fatty acids circulating in the bloodstreams of feeding pythons promote healthy heart growth, results that may have implications for treating human heart disease. CU-Boulder Professor Leslie Leinwand and her research team found the amount of triglycerides -- the main constituent of natural...

2006-01-04 17:10:55

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Heart conditions became worse in male mice carrying a genetic mutation for heart disease when they were fed a soy diet, a study published on Wednesday showed. Male mice carrying the mutation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or HCM, were severely affected by the soy diet, showing enlarged heart muscles and eventual heart failure, according to the University of Colorado at Boulder study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. HCM is the leading cause...

2006-01-04 17:01:32

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Heart conditions became worse in male mice carrying a genetic mutation for heart disease when they were fed a soy diet, a study published on Wednesday showed. Male mice carrying the mutation for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or HCM, were severely affected by the soy diet, showing enlarged heart muscles and eventual heart failure, according to the University of Colorado at Boulder study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. HCM is the leading cause...