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Latest Life expectancy Stories

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2010-03-23 07:16:29

Population-based interventions needed to reduce deaths from chronic diseases A new study led by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) in collaboration with researchers from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington estimates that smoking, high blood pressure, elevated blood glucose and overweight and obesity currently reduce life expectancy in the U.S. by 4.9 years in men and 4.1 years in women. It is the first study to look at...

2010-03-10 07:22:06

Research: Sex, health, and years of sexually active life gained due to good health: Evidence from 2 US population based cross sectional surveys of aging People who are in good health are almost twice as likely to be interested in sex compared to those in poor health, according to research published on bmj.com March 9. It is already established that sexual activity has health benefits and is linked to living longer. However, this study investigates how general health impacts on the quality of...

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2009-12-09 08:30:00

Regardless of an individual's dietary and lifestyle risk factors, living in a poorer or more socioeconomically deprived neighborhood may increase a person's risk for death, according to data presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held Dec. 6-9, 2009. Researchers conducted the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study and found that people living in poorer neighborhoods, as determined by U.S. Census data, reported higher health...

2009-12-03 13:52:59

University of Michigan and Harvard researchers find that the US population won't live longer because even though they've quit smoking, more are overweight If obesity trends continue, the negative effect on the health of the U.S. population will overtake the benefits gained from declining smoking rates, according to a study by U-M and Harvard researchers published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. "Obesity plays a large role in life expectancy," said co-author Allison B. Rosen,...

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2009-12-03 08:00:00

Married people in the United States are living longer these days, but the widowed are experiencing a higher mortality rate, according to new research by a Michigan State University sociologist. The widening mortality gap between the two groups is a disturbing trend that should prompt scholars and politicians to seek out strategies to better protect and promote health for the widowed, said Hui Liu, study author and assistant professor of sociology. Liu's study, called "Till Death Do Us Part:...

2009-12-02 16:01:00

University of Michigan and Harvard Researchers Find That The U.S. Population Won't Live Longer Because Even Though They've Quit Smoking, More are Overweight ANN ARBOR, Mich., Dec. 2 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- If obesity trends continue, the negative effect on the health of the U.S. population will overtake the benefits gained from declining smoking rates, according to a study by U-M and Harvard researchers published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. "Obesity plays a large...

2009-10-27 12:24:04

Research: Mortality among residents of shelters, rooming houses and hotels in Canada: 11-year follow-up study Homeless and marginally housed people have much higher mortality and shorter life expectancy than could be expected on the basis of low income alone, concludes a study from Canada published on bmj.com today. Previous studies have found high levels of excess mortality among the homeless compared with the general population, but little information is available on death rates among...

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2009-10-02 12:15:00

More than half of babies born in wealthy countries this century are likely to live to be at least 100 years old, according to new research. Writing in the Lancet medical journal, Kaare Christensen, of the Danish Ageing Research Centre at the University of Southern Denmark, noted that life expectancy in most developed nations has increased by about 30 years during the 20th century. "Very long lives are not the distant privilege of remote future generations -- very long lives are the probable...

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2009-09-29 08:56:25

The Great Depression had a silver lining: During that hard time, U.S. life expectancy actually increased by 6.2 years, according to a University of Michigan study published in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Life expectancy rose from 57.1 in 1929 to 63.3 years in 1932, according to the analysis by U-M researchers Jos© A. Tapia Granados and Ana Diez Roux. The increase occurred for both men and women, and for whites and non-whites. "The finding is...

2009-09-11 10:40:00

Research: Comparisons between geographies of mortality and deprivation from the 1900s and 2001: Spatial analysis of census and mortality statistics The link between deprivation and premature death is as strong today as it was in the early 1900s according to research published on bmj.com September 10. The study, the first of its kind to directly compare modern deprivation and mortality with conditions a century ago in the whole of England and Wales, has been undertaken by Ian Gregory, Senior...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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