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Latest Linnean Society Stories

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2011-03-01 09:58:42

In the mating game, some female mites are mightier than their mates, new research at the University of Michigan and the Russian Academy of Sciences suggests. The evidence comes, in part, from 40 million-year-old mating mites preserved in Baltic amber. In a paper published March 1 in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, researchers Pavel Klimov and Ekaterina Sidorchuk describe an extinct mite species in which the traditional sex roles were reversed. "In this species, it is the female...

efc76b80fe9746ebd1837ce90e425e52
2010-10-12 23:26:30

University of Florida researchers presenting new fossil evidence of an exceptionally well-preserved 55-million-year-old North American mammal have found it shares a common ancestor with rodents and primates, including humans.The study, scheduled to appear in the Oct. 11 online edition of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, describes the cranial anatomy of the extinct mammal, Labidolemur kayi. High resolution CT scans of the specimens allowed researchers to study minute details in...

2010-10-12 16:35:49

University of Florida researchers presenting new fossil evidence of an exceptionally well-preserved 55-million-year-old North American mammal have found it shares a common ancestor with rodents and primates, including humans. The study, scheduled to appear in the Oct. 11 online edition of the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, describes the cranial anatomy of the extinct mammal, Labidolemur kayi. High resolution CT scans of the specimens allowed researchers to study minute details in...

7382cd35edbb6847e4d4409da6611e5e1
2010-08-26 12:40:00

The evolutionary history of the Thaumoctopus mimicus lineage reveals the steps it took to become a master of disguise Paul the Octopus"”the eight-legged oracle who made international headlines with his amazingly accurate football forecasting"”isn't the only talented cephalopod in the sea. The Indonesian mimic octopus, which can impersonate flatfish and sea snakes to dupe potential predators, may well give Paul a run for his money when it comes to "see-worthy" skills. By creatively...

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2010-06-01 10:38:17

Nepenthes attenboroughii, named after Sir David Attenborough, honorary Fellow of the Linnean Society, has been ranked number 1 Each year The International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University names the Top 10 new species described in the previous calendar year. The list for 2009 was published to coincide with the 303rd anniversary on May 23rd of the birth of Carl Linnaeus. It contains only two new plant species, one of which was first published in the Botanical...

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2009-12-22 14:43:56

Museum Victoria palaeobiologist Dr Erich Fitzgerald has made new groundbreaking discoveries into the origin of baleen whales, based on a 25 million year old fossil found near Torquay in Victoria. Dr Fitzgerald's study, which is published in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, is centered on Mammalodon colliveri, a primitive toothed baleen whale, one of a group of whales that includes the largest animal ever to have lived, the blue whale. Although Mammalodon was discovered in 1932...

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2009-12-15 07:18:59

In first-time experiments in the wild, a researcher at Brown University has discovered that a species of bat in Madagascar, Myzopoda aurita, uses wet adhesion to attach itself to surfaces. The finding explains why the bat "” unlike almost all others "” roosts head-up. It also helps to explain how it differs from a similar head-up roosting species. Results appear in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. There are approximately 1,200 species of bats worldwide. Of that...

2009-09-03 09:51:20

Flowering plants are all around us and are phenomenally successful"”but how did they get to be so successful and where did they come from? This question bothered Darwin and others and a paper published in the September issue of the Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society indicates that their ability to adapt anatomically may be the answer. Sherwin Carlquist, a research botanist at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden and recipient of the Linnean Medal for Botany, has spent his career...

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2009-08-11 13:45:00

A new plant species has been discovered in the central Philippines - a giant carnivorous plant. The plant is the largest of all pitchers and is so big that it can catch rats as well as insects in its trap. Botanists came across the strange pink ferns - as well as blue mushrooms - during an expedition. The botanists named the pitcher plant after British natural history broadcaster David Attenborough. The details of the discovery were published in the Botanical Journal of the...

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2008-01-17 10:45:00

On Thursday, botanists revealed that a self-destructing palm tree that flowers once every 100 years and then dies has been discovered on the Indian Ocean island of Madagascar. An article by Kew Gardens scientists published in the Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society details the name of the giant palm and its remarkable life cycle.Mijoro Rakotoarinivo, who works for the London botanical gardens in Madagascar, told AP, "It's spectacular. It does not flower for maybe 100 years and when it's...


Latest Linnean Society Reference Libraries

Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society
2012-06-04 19:37:21

The Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society is a scientific journal established in 1858 and published by Wiley on behalf of the Linnean Society of London. The journal evolved from the Society’s original journal Transactions, which was an essential publication for scientists and researchers working in the field of botany. The journal publishes original papers relating to the taxonomy of all plant groups and fungi, including anatomy, biosystematics, cytology, ecology, ethnobotany,...

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Word of the Day
malpais
  • The ragged surface of a lava-flow.
'Malpais' translates from Spanish as 'bad land.'