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Latest Lipid bilayer Stories

2010-07-28 13:16:15

Drug delivery inside the body is a complicated process. Compounds travel through a maze of aqueous solutions, lipid membranes, and barriers between the blood and tissues like the brain. Research reported in the American Institute of Physics publication the Journal of Chemical Physics presents a theoretical model that accurately predicts the hydration free energy (HFE) of a wide variety of organic compounds. "HFE determines solubility and allows accurate prediction of a compound's path in a...

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2010-05-20 12:30:00

A new transistor controlled by the molecule that powers biological cells is bringing humans and machines one-step closer to merging. The device could be used in medical devices or prosthetics wired directly into the human body because of its nano-scale size. "Our devices make a bridge between the biological world and the electronic world," Aleksandr Noy, who developed the transistor along with colleagues at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories in California, told MSN News.  "In...

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2010-04-28 13:15:00

Thanks to an interdisciplinary team of researchers, scientists now have a more complete understanding of one of the human body's most vital structures: the red blood cell. Led by University of Illinois electrical and computer engineering professor Gabriel Popescu, the team developed a model that could lead to breakthroughs in screening and treatment of blood-cell-morphology diseases, such as malaria and sickle-cell disease. The group published its findings in the Proceedings of the National...

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2009-12-23 12:24:23

Much like a tightly wound drum, red blood cells are in perpetual vibration. Those vibrations help the cells maintain their characteristic flattened oval or disc shape, which is critical to their ability to deform as they traverse blood vessels in the body to deliver oxygen to tissues. Blood disorders such as malaria, sickle cell anemia and spherocytosis interfere with those vibrations, so a better understanding of the vibrations could help researchers develop treatments for those diseases....

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2009-10-22 14:29:21

Trying to understand the complex workings of a biological cell by teasing out the function of every molecule within it is a daunting task. But by making synthetic cells that include just a few chemical processes, researchers can study cellular machinery one manageable piece at a time. A new paper* from researchers at Yale University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) describes a highly simplified model cell that not only sheds light on the way certain real cells...

2009-09-28 12:14:26

Using an RNA-powered nanomotor, University of Cincinnati (UC) biomedical engineering researchers have successfully developed an artificial pore able to transmit nanoscale material through a membrane. In a study led by UC biomedical engineering professor Peixuan Guo, PhD, members of the UC team inserted the modified core of a nanomotor, a microscopic biological machine, into a lipid membrane. The resulting channel enabled them to move both single- and double-stranded DNA through the membrane....

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2009-07-29 13:20:00

'Atlastin' builds critical structures; does job in fundamentally new way Italian and U.S. biologists this week report that a little-understood protein previously implicated in a rare genetic disorder plays an unexpected and critical role in building and maintaining healthy cells. Even more surprising, their report in the journal Nature shows that the protein, called "atlastin," does its work by fusing intracellular membranes in a previously undocumented way."If you'd asked me a year ago...

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2009-07-22 15:40:00

Applying biological molecules from cell membranes to the surfaces of artificial materials is opening peepholes on the very basics of cell-to-cell interaction.Two recently published papers by a University of Oregon biophysicist and colleagues suggest that putting lipids and other cell membrane components on manufactured surfaces could lead to new classes of self-assembling materials for use in precision optics, nanotechnology, electronics and pharmaceuticals.Though the findings are basic, they...

2008-08-22 03:00:15

By Anglin, Timothy C Conboy, John C ABSTRACT The dependence of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine (DPPC) flip-flop kinetics on the lateral membrane pressure in a phospholipid bilayer was investigated by sum- frequency vibrational spectroscopy. Planar-supported lipid bilayers were prepared on fused silica supports using the Langmuir-Blodgett/ Langmuir-Schaeffer technique, which allows precise control over the lateral surface pressure and packing density of the membrane. The lipid...

2008-07-25 03:00:21

By Churchward, Matthew A Rogasevskaia, Tatiana; Brandman, David M; Khosravani, Houman; Nava, Phillip; Atkinson, Jeffrey K; Coorssen, Jens R ABSTRACT The Ca^sup 2+^-triggered merger of two apposed membranes is the defining step of regulated exocytosis. CHOL is required at critical levels in secretory vesicle membranes to enable efficient, native membrane fusion: CHOL-sphingomyelin enriched microdomains organize the site and regulate fusion efficiency, and CHOL directly supports the capacity...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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