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Latest Lithics Stories

Early Humans May Have Preyed On Elephant Ancestor Gomphothere
2014-07-15 12:58:30

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Gomphotheres, genetic relatives of the elephant, were thought to have roamed North America and became extinct long before humans reached the continent. But, according to a new study, researchers have uncovered evidence that North America’s earliest humans may have preyed on the ancient mammals. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, study researchers from the United States and Mexico found remains of...

2014-06-13 08:20:47

AT&T's It Can Wait Movement Celebrated as Year's Best Campaign; LGBT Campaign With AT&T Also Wins Anvil NEW YORK, June 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- AT&T and FleishmanHillard have received the Public Relations Society of America's (PRSA) Best of Silver Anvil Award. The award, given to AT&T's It Can Wait no-texting-while-driving program, celebrates the industry's top campaign of the year. The honor was announced at PRSA's annual Silver Anvil ceremony. The It Can Wait program,...

2014-04-04 20:22:17

VISTA, Calif., April 4, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Exquisite Knives launches a new, easily navigated site, ideal for knife collectors and enthusiast looking to expand their collections. The handcrafted array of top-notch blades by the top craftsmen in the world is currently available for access at www.ExquisiteKnives.com. This new, interactive site encourages knife collectors to browse and purchase some of the most sought after knives on a more reachable platform. Many are unaware of the...

Ancient Syrians Chose Buying Local Instead Of Importing
2013-10-16 15:02:48

University of Sheffield An archaeologist at the University of Sheffield has found evidence that, contrary to a widely held theory, ancient Syrians made their stone tools locally instead of importing finished tools from Turkey. The discovery, newly published online in Journal of Archaeological Science, has implications for our understanding of how early cities developed in these regions and how the geographic origins of raw materials affect developing states. During the Early Bronze...

New Sourcing Technique Detects Obsidian In Seconds
2013-09-10 09:27:02

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Obsidian is a naturally occurring volcanic glass with a smooth, hard surface. It is far sharper than a surgical scalpel when fractured, making the glass a highly desirable raw material for crafting stone tools for almost all of human history. Found in East Africa, the earliest obsidian tools are nearly two million years old, and today, doctors still use obsidian scalpels in specialized medical procedures. The chemical composition of...

Neanderthal Tools Cultural Differences
2013-08-19 16:17:52

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new analysis from an archeologist at the University of Southampton in the United Kingdom has revealed distinct cultural differences between two groups of Neanderthals based on the divergent design of stone tools between 115,000 and 35,000 years ago. According to a study by researcher Karen Ruebens, the differences point to a more complex Neanderthal culture than what was previously suspected. "In Germany and France there appears to...

2013-05-22 23:17:12

From his knowledge of weapon wounds, the surgical treatment of the time and careful forensic anthropology analysis, Prof. Agelarakis deduced that the shaft of the arrow and part of one of its three lobes had been removed by Greek field surgeons. However, the rest of the arrowhead suspected to be hooked (barbed) had to be left in place, because attempts to remove it were unsuccessful. New Hyde Park, NY (PRWEB) May 22, 2013 It took less than 10 seconds to reveal the truth about a wounded...

Researchers Study Earliest Evidence Of Human Hunting And Scavenging
2013-05-11 08:19:44

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online New light has been shed on the diet and food acquisition strategies of some of the earliest human ancestors in Africa, according to a new study led by Baylor University. Early tool making humans, known as Oldowan hominin, started to exhibit a number of physiological and ecological adaptations beginning around two million years ago. These adaptations, including an increase in brain and body size, heavier investment in their...

Answer To Handaxe Mystery Is 'Trust'
2012-11-21 13:18:45

University of York Trust rather than lust is at the heart of the attention to detail and finely made form of handaxes from around 1.7 million years ago, according to a University of York researcher. Dr Penny Spikins, from the Department of Archaeology, suggests a desire to prove their trustworthiness, rather than a need to demonstrate their physical fitness as a mate, was the driving force behind the fine crafting of handaxes by Homo erectus/ergaster in the Lower Palaeolithic period....


Latest Lithics Reference Libraries

28_56635877b282726a86b25cf3e98722c2
2005-05-26 11:30:45

Chert is a fine-grained silica-rich cryptocrystalline sedimentary rock that may contain small fossils. It varies greatly in color from white to black, but most often manifests as gray, brown, grayish brown and light green to rusty red; its color is an expression of trace elements present in the rock, and both red and green are most often related to traces of iron (in its oxidized and reduced forms respectively). It outcrops as nodules in limestone, chalk, and dolostone formations as a...

28_a5eb67134d4fd71497d9b5906bb8a812
2005-05-25 18:55:31

Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's crust. It has a hexagonal crystal structure made of trigonal crystallized silica (silicon dioxide, SiO2), with a hardness of 7 on the Mohs scale. Density is 2.6 g/cm³. The typical shape is a six-sided prism that ends in six-sided pyramids, although these are often distorted, or so massive that only part of the shape is apparent from a mined specimen. Additionally a bed is a common form, particularly for varieties such as amethyst,...

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Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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