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Latest Lithics Stories

25561a3f339862183c8b062c6f9289551
2010-11-04 10:11:20

Was it the evolution of the hand, or of the brain, that enabled prehistoric toolmakers to make the leap from simple flakes of rock to a sophisticated hand axe? A new study finds that the ability to plan complex tasks was key. The research, published today in the Public Library of Science journal PLoS ONE, is the first to use a cyber data glove to precisely measure the hand movements of stone tool making, and compare the results to brain activation. "Making a hand axe appears to require...

22fa60f7f7b507f808544f9faa1b9bf31
2010-10-29 07:04:00

Researchers have discovered the oldest evidence to date that prehistoric humans in southern Africa had mastered a complex, delicate process to sharpen stones into spears and knives at least 75,000 years ago, more than 50,000 years earlier than previously believed, according to a study published Thursday. The technique, known as pressure flaking, took place at Blombos Cave in modern day South Africa during the Middle Stone Age by anatomically modern humans, and involved the heating of silcrete...

2010-07-29 16:57:52

What's a Stone Age axe doing in an Iron Age tomb? The archaeologists Olle Hemdorff at the University of Stavanger's Museum of Archaeology and Eva Thäte are researching older objects in younger graves. They have found a pattern. "If one finds something once, it's accidental. If it is found twice, it's puzzling. If found thrice, there is a pattern", the archaeologists Olle Hemdorff and Eva Thäte say. In 2005 the archaeologists investigated a grave at Avaldsnes in Karmøy in...

2010-07-20 13:25:00

CINCINNATI, July 20 /PRNewswire/ -- /Havalon Knives/ - Havalon Knives is proud to announce the official release of their "Quik-Change" fillet knife: the Havalon Baracuta. In 2005, Havalon Knives introduced the Piranta series of replaceable blade skinning knives. The surgically-sharp, replaceable blades eliminate the need to carry a whetstone or sharpening tools. The Piranta series has been so popular, that fishing enthusiasts have asked Havalon repeatedly to produce a longer replaceable...

2009-06-25 12:46:55

U.S. archaeologists are using obsidian flakes left from the carving of tools to answer many questions about early human beings. University of Washington and Smithsonian Institute archaeologists used X-ray fluorescence spectrometers to determine the origin of 131 flakes of obsidian, a volcanic glass, found at 18 sites on eight islands in the Kurils. The flakes were found with other artifacts and dated to 2,500 to 750 years ago. The Kuril Archipelago stretches nearly 800 miles between the...

2009-06-22 13:57:37

Archaeologists have used stone tools to answer many questions about human ancestors in both the distant and near past and now they are analyzing the origin of obsidian flakes to better understand how people settled and interacted in the inhospitable Kuril Islands.Using X-ray fluorescence spectrometers, archaeologists from the University of Washington and the Smithsonian Institution have found the origin of 131 flakes of obsidian, a volcanic glass. These small flakes were discarded after stone...

2009-02-23 14:02:00

CINCINNATI, Feb. 23 /PRNewswire/ -- Since the brand's inception in 2005, hunters and guides have praised the innovative function of the Piranta series from Havalon Knives. The surgically-sharp replaceable blades eliminate the need to carry a whetstone or stop to sharpen knives out in the field. In the tradition of offering exceptional products such as the Original Piranta, the Piranta-Z and the Piranta-EDGE, Havalon Knives is launching a new Piranta knife: the Piranta-Predator....

2009-01-22 13:56:13

Police in Florida said a man was arrested after he allegedly pulled a knife on his brother during an argument about chicken wings. Investigators said Calvin Edwards, 48, of Fort Pierce was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and battery after the alleged Tuesday incident, TCPalm.com reported Thursday. The arrest affidavit quotes Edwards' brother as saying he and his sibling were scuffling over chicken wings when Calvin pulled a small pocket knife and threatened to cut him....

2008-11-03 09:00:09

Arizona State University (ASU) and Obsidian Strategics, the leading developer of InfiniBand range extension, routing and encryption technology, have announced a unique public-private partnership to explore faster, more efficient data server/transfer technologies for use at the ASU High Performance Computing Initiative (HPCI) facilities, on the ASU campus in downtown Tempe. ASU and Obsidian will join with others to advance the capabilities of the optical network linking the higher...

2008-08-15 09:00:24

By John Noble Wilford New York Times News Service When Paul C. Sereno went hunting dinosaur bones in the Sahara, his career took a sharp turn from paleontology to archaeology. The expedition found what has proved to be the largest known graveyard of Stone Age people who lived there when the desert was green. The first traces of pottery, stone tools and human skeletons were discovered eight years ago at a site in the southern Sahara in Niger. After preliminary research, Sereno, a...


Latest Lithics Reference Libraries

28_56635877b282726a86b25cf3e98722c2
2005-05-26 11:30:45

Chert is a fine-grained silica-rich cryptocrystalline sedimentary rock that may contain small fossils. It varies greatly in color from white to black, but most often manifests as gray, brown, grayish brown and light green to rusty red; its color is an expression of trace elements present in the rock, and both red and green are most often related to traces of iron (in its oxidized and reduced forms respectively). It outcrops as nodules in limestone, chalk, and dolostone formations as a...

28_a5eb67134d4fd71497d9b5906bb8a812
2005-05-25 18:55:31

Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's crust. It has a hexagonal crystal structure made of trigonal crystallized silica (silicon dioxide, SiO2), with a hardness of 7 on the Mohs scale. Density is 2.6 g/cm³. The typical shape is a six-sided prism that ends in six-sided pyramids, although these are often distorted, or so massive that only part of the shape is apparent from a mined specimen. Additionally a bed is a common form, particularly for varieties such as amethyst,...

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Word of the Day
grass-comber
  • A landsman who is making his first voyage at sea; a novice who enters naval service from rural life.
According to the OED, a grass-comber is also 'a sailor's term for one who has been a farm-labourer.'