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Latest Little brown bat Stories

2011-08-20 07:00:00

If bats have invaded your home, August and Early Fall is the ideal time to take care of business. This is when bats leave their roost so this is the window of opportunity to "bat proof" a home and exclude them from returning during their winter absence. Bats are extremely roost-faithful, returning year after year to the same building sites. If exclusionary measures are not implemented, the bats will likely return. But before bats are excluded, they need to be evicted just like a bad...

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2011-06-01 08:17:44

University of Calgary research finds urban life not healthy for bats In the treeless, flat Prairie, you'd think a city would provide a good home for bats who like to snuggle up and roost in trees and buildings. But researchers at the University of Calgary made the surprising discovery that the urban landscape is far from ideal for these animals. "I was really surprised," says Dr. Joanna Coleman, a sessional lecturer and recent PhD graduate in biological sciences at the University of Calgary...

2011-04-01 10:50:00

BOSTON, April 1, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Thomas Kunz, Warren Distinguished Professor in Boston University's Department of Biology, has coauthored an analysis published this week in the journal Science that shows how declines of bat populations caused by a new wildlife disease and fatalities at industrial-scale wind turbines could lead to substantial economic losses on the farm. Natural pest-control services provided by insect-eating bats in the United States likely save the U.S....

2011-03-03 12:35:57

All night long, bats swoop over our landscape consuming insects, but they do this in secret, hidden from our view.  Until recently, scientists have been unable to bring their ecosystem out of the dark but thanks to new genetic techniques, researchers from the University of Bristol and Biodiversity Institute of Ontario, Canada, have been able to reconstruct the environment supporting these elusive creatures. Working at three sites in Southern Ontario (Canada) the team of students and...

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2011-02-15 07:00:00

Culling will not stop the spread of a deadly fungus that is threatening to wipe out hibernating bats in North America, according to a new mathematical model. White-nose syndrome, which is estimated to have killed over a million bats in a three year period, is probably caused by a newly discovered cold-adapted fungus, Geomyces destructans. The new model examines how WNS is passed from bat to bat and concludes that culling would not work because of the complexity of bat life history and because...

2011-02-03 17:41:30

Scientists suggest a roadmap to tackle disease which has killed over 1 million bats Conservationists across the United States are racing to discover a solution to White-Nose Syndrome, a disease that is threatening to wipe out bat species across North America. A review published in Conservation Biology reveals that although WNS has already killed one million bats, there are critical knowledge gaps preventing researchers from combating the disease. WNS is a fatal disease that targets...

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2010-08-06 06:30:00

One of North America's most common bat species faces extinction in the northeastern U.S. within the next two decades due to a rapidly spreading disease known as White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), according to a new study led by researchers at the Boston University College of Arts & Sciences. The threatened bats, known as little brown myotis, are critical in controlling insects that spread disease to humans and animals.  The bats have been known to consume their own weight in insects in a...

2010-06-23 08:48:00

Survey part of national WNS monitoring effort HARRISBURG, Pa., June 23 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Pennsylvania Game Commission biologists are seeking assistance from residents in a regional monitoring effort to collect bat maternity colony data this summer. This monitoring is especially important due to the mortalities in bat populations throughout the northeastern United States, including Pennsylvania, being caused by White-Nose Syndrome (WNS). "WNS primarily kills during the winter,...

2010-01-12 12:34:00

Three years later, hibernating bats continue to fall to this disorder HARRISBURG, Pa., Jan. 12 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- White Nose Syndrome (WNS) has caused cave bat population reductions in New York and New England over the past three winters. It surfaced near Albany in 2006. Pennsylvania Game Commission officials say that they are expecting cave bat mortalities this winter if the disorder spreads through hibernacula as it did New York and New England over the previous winters. To track...

2009-02-03 14:42:00

Stricken bats die in and around their hibernation quarters at two abandoned mines. Game Commission seeks public's help in identifying other sites. HARRISBURG, Pa., Feb. 3 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The following was written by Joe Kosack, Wildlife Conservation Education Specialist, Pennsylvania Game Commission: Several hundred little brown bats are dead from White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) in Lackawanna County, and the Pennsylvania Game Commission is looking to residents for help uncovering...


Latest Little brown bat Reference Libraries

Indiana Bat, Myotis sodalist
2012-10-05 08:36:41

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalist) is a mouse-eared bat that can be found in North America. Its range primarily includes eastern and Midwestern states, but it can be found in some southern areas of the United States. During the winter, its range becomes much smaller, with most populations occurring in large clusters in only a few caves. One study conducted in 1985 suggested that an estimated 244,000 individuals of this species reside in Indiana. Its range overlaps that of the endangered gray...

Little Brown Bat, Myotis lucifugus
2012-05-03 12:32:22

The little brown bat (Myotis lucifugus) is also known as the little brown myotis. It is a species in the Myotis genus, or mouse-eared bats. It is one of the most common North American bats, and is a good species to use when studying bats. This species has been included in the Mammalian Genome Project. The range of this bat includes the northern half of the United States and southern Canada. More males than females have been found in the northern range of the little brown bat, but there has...

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Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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