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Latest Lizards Stories

2011-05-12 10:54:35

The great desert burrowing skink, a lizard living on the sandy plains of Central Australia, has been discovered to live in family groups within elaborately constructed tunnel complexes. Published in PLoS One, researchers Steve McAlpin, Paul Duckett and Adam Stow from Macquarie University, in partnership with Parks Australia, found that family members of the great desert burrowing skink contribute to the construction and maintenance of burrow systems that can have up to 20 entrances, extend...

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2010-12-21 08:22:45

It's long been accepted by biologists that environmental factors cause the diversity"”or number"”of species to increase before eventually leveling off. Some recent work, however, has suggested that species diversity continues instead of entering into a state of equilibrium. But new research on lizards in the Caribbean not only supports the original theory that finite space, limited food supplies, and competition for resources all work together to achieve equilibrium; it builds on...

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2010-10-07 08:54:54

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have found that a species of lizard in the Mojave Desert lives in family groups and shows patterns of social behavior more commonly associated with mammals and birds. Their investigation of the formation and stability of family groups in desert night lizards (Xantusia vigilis) provides new insights into the evolution of cooperative behavior. The researchers reported the results of a five-year study of desert night lizards in a paper...

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2010-09-02 11:03:48

TAU develops advanced method for measuring lizard weight from size Lizards are an important indicator species for understanding the condition of specific ecosystems. Their body weight is a crucial index for evaluating species health, but lizards are seldom weighed, perhaps due in part to the recurring problem of spontaneous tail loss when lizards are in stress. Now ecological researchers have a better way of evaluating these lizards. Dr. Shai Meiri of Tel Aviv University's Department of...

2010-08-26 17:02:54

A new ecological network is urgently needed in Northern Ireland to ensure the continued survival of its precious lizard population, according to researchers at Queen's University Belfast. Lizards are found in coastal areas, heath and boglands around Northern Ireland, but a Queen's study, published in international journal Amphibia-Reptilia, has found their natural habitats may have been replaced through agricultural intensification. "The fact that Northern Ireland has a lizard population will...

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2010-08-03 10:41:55

New research shows that when some fence lizards are attacked by fire ants they "stress out"-- a response that actually helps the species to survive by heightening the animal's awareness of imminent danger. Tracy Langkilde, assistant professor of biology at Penn State University, found that lizards living in areas of the southeastern United States, where large numbers of fire ants also live, have elevated levels of stress hormones, called glucocorticoids. The stress-hormone study comes on the...

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2010-06-19 08:03:13

Millions of years before humans began battling it out over beachfront property, a similar phenomenon was unfolding in a diverse group of island lizards. Often mistaken for chameleons or geckos, Anolis lizards fight fiercely for resources, responding to rivals by doing push-ups and puffing out their throat pouches. But anoles also compete in ways that shape their bodies over evolutionary time, says a new study in the journal Evolution. Anolis lizards colonized the Caribbean from South America...

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2010-05-10 11:05:00

By using entire islands as experimental laboratories, two Dartmouth biologists have performed one of the largest manipulations of natural selection ever conducted in a wild animal population. Their results, published online on May 9 by the journal Nature, show that competition among lizards is more important than predation by birds and snakes when it comes to survival of the fittest lizard. "When Tennyson wrote that nature is 'red in tooth and claw', I think the image in his head was...

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2009-12-02 12:26:49

A scientist from the University of Salamanca and another from Yale University have shown that the presence of predators affects the behavior of Acanthodactylus beershebensis, a lizard species from the Negev Desert in the Near East. According to the study, these reptiles move less and catch less mobile and different prey if they are under pressure from predators. Many theoretical models had predicted this result, but until now there had been very few experimental trials and none in the case of...

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2009-07-21 20:25:00

A thorough study of the million-year evolution of California's horned lizards, sometimes referred to as "horny toads," shows that when it comes to distinguishing such recently diverged species, the most powerful method integrates genetic, anatomical and ecological information.In the study, published this week in the early online edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and the U.S. Geological Survey...


Latest Lizards Reference Libraries

41_22244993cabaccde2ccff2a2b8a2d778
2007-04-18 14:30:36

The Desert Iguana, Dipsosaurus dorsalis, is one of the most common lizards of the Sonoran and Mojave deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico. They also can be found on several islands in the Gulf of California. Their preferred habitat is largely contained within the range of the creosote bush, mainly dry, sandy desert scrubland below 3300 ft. It can also be found in rocky streambeds up to 3300 ft. In the southern portion of its range this lizard lives in areas of...

0_8f023dda3e8dc6d6beae9a3c48deec69
2007-04-15 20:58:50

The Brown Basilisk or Striped Basilisk, Basiliscus vittatus, is a species of lizard native to Central America, but have been introduced into the wild in the U.S. state of Florida. They are also called the common basilisk and, the "Jesus Lizard" because when it flees from predators it runs very fast and can even run on top of water. Basilisks actually have large hind feet with flaps of skin between each toe. The fact that they move quickly across the water, aided by their web-like feet,...

41_b202465c7a50820c07c40126e8cabd2e
2007-03-19 15:27:17

The Southern Alligator Lizard, Elgaria multicarinata, is a lizard native to the Pacific coast of North America. It is common throughout Southern California and can be found in both grasslands and urban areas. Several subspecies can be distinguished, including the San Diego alligator lizard. It has a prehensile tail up to twice the length of its body. Like many lizards, however, it can drop its tail if attacked, possibly giving it a chance to flee; the tail will regenerate, but will never...

41_532b43ed661dd5d177a7fbabf489932f
2007-01-02 11:41:40

The Beaded Lizard or Mexican Beaded Lizard, Heloderma horridum, is a venomous lizard found in Mexico and the southern United States. Adult Mexican Beaded Lizards range from 13 to 18 inches in length. Until recently, the beaded lizard and the Gila Monster were the only two lizards known to be venomous. Research showed that some iguanas and monitors are also venomous. The beaded lizards' venom is similar to that of some snakes (e.g. the western diamondback rattler).

36_c6f37633dd57c4731b2c90e3e003be0b
2005-06-22 15:10:54

Chuckwallas (less commonly known as Chuckawallas) are large, bulky lizards found mainly in arid regions of the southwestern United States and northern Mexico, although some are found on coastal islands. There are five species of Chuckwalla, all within the genus Sauromalus; they are part of the iguana family, Iguanidae. The name Chuckwalla derives from the Shoshone word "tcaxxwal" or Cahullia "caxwal", transcribed by Spaniards as "chacahuala". Physical description Reaching a total...

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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