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Latest Local Group Stories

Scientists Create The First 360-Degree Virtual Map Of The Milky Way
2014-03-21 07:25:44

[ Watch the Video: 360-Degree View of the Milky Way ] Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope has been busy studying stars, asteroids, galaxies and other outer space objects over the past 10 years and a University of Wisconsin team of scientists has now used more than two million images produced by Spitzer to create a virtual 360-degree mosaic of our Milky Way. The team presented the new interactive map Thursday at the TEDActive 2014...

2014-03-20 16:21:06

WASHINGTON, March 20, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Touring the Milky Way now is as easy as clicking a button with NASA's new zoomable, 360-degree mosaic presented Thursday at the TEDActive 2014 Conference in Vancouver, Canada. http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnvar/20081007/38461LOGO The star-studded panorama of our galaxy is constructed from more than 2 million infrared snapshots taken over the past 10 years by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. "If we actually printed this out, we'd...

Collage of galaxies in the Herschel Reference Survey
2014-03-18 19:58:57

ESA The largest census of dust in local galaxies has been completed using data from ESA’s Herschel space observatory, providing a huge legacy to the scientific community. Cosmic dust grains are a minor but fundamental ingredient in the recipe of gas and dust for creating stars and planets. But despite its importance, there is an incomplete picture of the dust properties in galaxies beyond our own Milky Way. Key questions include how the dust varies with the type of galaxy, and how...

What Lies Beyond: Astronomer Maps Galaxies Near Our Own
2014-03-11 13:13:33

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A new paper published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society has broadened the view of what lies just past our galaxy. The Milky Way and Andromeda are dominant members of a small group of galaxies. However, not a lot has been known about the smaller galaxies that reside within our neighborhood in the universe. York University Physics & Astronomy Professor Marshall McCall was able to map out the bright galaxies...

Spiral Galaxy M81 is an example of a fat bulgy galaxy
2014-02-28 11:19:26

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online A pair of Australian astrophysicists has shown that the shape of a galaxy is determined by how fast it spins, according to a new report in The Astrophysical Journal. Part of “The Evolving Universe” research series at the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO) in Australia, the new study concluded that fatter spiral galaxies are relatively slow spinning, while thinner spiral galaxies are rotating are higher...

Andromeda galaxy
2014-02-24 04:27:39

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online An international team of astronomers studying the satellite galaxies surrounding Andromeda has for the first time observed the remnant of a merger between two low-mass dwarf galaxies, according to new research published online Sunday in the journal Nature. The study authors, who hail from the Niels Bohr Institute at the University of Copenhagen, the University of Cambridge’s Institute of Astronomy and the Max Planck Institute...

Large Magellanic Cloud Completes One Rotation Every 250M Years
2014-02-18 13:13:39

[ Watch the Video: Large Magellanic Cloud Rotation Cycle ] Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope found that the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) completes a rotation every 250 million years. The team used Hubble to measure the average motion of hundreds of individual stars in the nearby galaxy, which is located about 170,000 light-years from Earth. "Studying this nearby galaxy by tracking the stars' movements gives us a...

2014-02-18 12:36:25

WASHINGTON, Feb. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Using the sharp-eyed NASA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have for the first time precisely measured the rotation rate of a galaxy based on the clock-like movement of its stars. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) According to their analysis, the central part of the neighboring galaxy, called the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), completes a rotation every 250 million years. It takes our sun the same...

2014-01-29 12:20:28

WASHINGTON, Jan. 29, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Europe's Herschel Space Observatory have pieced together the evolutionary sequence of compact elliptical galaxies that erupted and burned out early in the history of the universe. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Enabled by Hubble's infrared imaging capabilities, astronomers have assembled for the first time a representative spectroscopic sampling of...

Astronomer Discovers Hydrogen River Flowing Into Nearby Galaxy
2014-01-28 09:52:49

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online What might be a never-before-seen river of hydrogen flowing through space has been discovered by West Virginia University astronomer, D.J. Pisano, using the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT). A study, published in the Astronomical Journal, reveals that this river is a faint, very tenuous filament of gas, which is streaming into the nearby galaxy, NGC 6946. Understanding this may help...


Latest Local Group Reference Libraries

45_9843bacae4e6aaccde9ad6442185fc8e
2010-09-16 15:14:03

The two Magellanic Clouds (or Nubeculae Magellani), composed of the Large Megellanic Cloud and the Small Magellanic Cloud, are irregular dwarf galaxies visible in the southern hemisphere. They are members of our Local Group and orbit the Milky Way galaxy. Persian astronomer Al Sufi, in 964, was the first to have written anything about the Magellanic Clouds proving they have been known since early time amongst the Middle East peoples. Sufi, in his Book of Fixed Stars, calls the clouds...

67_62ac767a66aa75de2afaba1deb05cb8c
2010-09-13 17:05:00

The Local Group, compromising more than 30 galaxies (including dwarf galaxies and the Milky Way), is a group of galaxies with a gravitational center located somewhere between the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. With a binary (dumbbell) shape and a total mass of (1.29 ± 0.14) × 1012M the Local group covers a 10 million light-year diameter. The local group is part of the Virgo Supercluster. The two largest galaxies in the group are the Milky Way and the Andromeda both Spiral...

0_0c560ad0ccf4d719031a7916437450a5
2010-09-13 16:59:36

The IC 342/Maffei Group (also known as the IC 342 Group or the Maffei 1 Group) is the closest group of galaxies to the Local Group. The member galaxies are both concentrated around the two brightest galaxies of IC 342 and Maffei 1. The group can therefore be described as a binary group. Along with many others the group is located in the Virgo Supercluster.

6_11b0e50afd172f6a61aeda24e25504702
2004-10-19 04:45:42

Ring Galaxy -- A subclass of interacting galaxies, ring galaxies, provides a unique laboratory for studying unusually large bursts of non-nuclear star formation. The rings in these systems are often large (10s of kiloparsecs) and contain what appear to be associations of giant H{\small II} regions. As a basis for future modeling of star forming regions in observed ring galaxies we present a series of combined n-body/gas numerical experiments on ring formation and evolution. Three...

6_d430450f9e0cfd67807619c4bc1fbdf32
2004-10-19 04:45:41

Irregular Galaxy -- In astronomy, a class of galaxy with little structure, which does not conform to any of the standard shapes in the Hubble classification. The two satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, the Magellanic Clouds, are both irregulars. Some galaxies previously classified as irregulars are now known to be normal galaxies distorted by tidal effects or undergoing bursts of star formation (see starburst galaxy). ----- NASA Click here to learn more on this topic from...

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Word of the Day
tesla
  • The unit of magnetic flux density in the International System of Units, equal to the magnitude of the magnetic field vector necessary to produce a force of one newton on a charge of one coulomb moving perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field vector with a velocity of one meter per second. It is equivalent to one weber per square meter.
This word is named for Nikola Tesla, the inventor, engineer, and futurist.