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Latest Locomotion Stories

2012-03-26 09:34:11

The George Washington University's Brian Richmond and team of researchers say chimps use 2 legs to reach and carry scarce resources Most of us walk and carry items in our hands every day. These are seemingly simple activities that the majority of us don't question. But an international team of researchers, including Brian Richmond at the George Washington University, have discovered that human bipedalism, or walking upright, may have originated millions of years ago as an adaptation to...

Image 1 - Butterflies Inspire Bug-Sized Flying Robots
2012-02-03 04:41:50

[ Watch the Video ] To improve the next generation of insect-size flying machines, Johns Hopkins engineers have been aiming high-speed video cameras at some of the prettiest bugs on the planet. By figuring out how butterflies flutter among flowers with amazing grace and agility, the researchers hope to help small airborne robots mimic these maneuvers. U.S. defense agencies, which have funded this research, are supporting the development of bug-size flyers to carry out reconnaissance,...

Image 1 - Snakes Inspire Search-and-Rescue Robots
2012-01-20 05:12:44

[ Watch the Video ] New Robot is Designed to Use Less Energy Designing an all-terrain robot for search-and-rescue missions is an arduous task for scientists. The machine must be flexible enough to move over uneven surfaces, yet not so big that it´s restricted from tight spaces. It might also be required to climb slopes of varying inclines. Existing robots can do many of these things, but the majority require large amounts of energy and are prone to overheating. Georgia Tech...

2012-01-05 16:03:36

Other than Olympic race walkers, people generally find it more comfortable to run than walk when they start moving at around 2 meters per second — about 4.5 miles per hour. North Carolina State University biomedical engineers Dr. Gregory Sawicki and Dr. Dominic Farris have discovered why: At 2 meters per second, running makes better use of an important calf muscle than walking, and therefore is a much more efficient use of the muscle´s — and the body´s — energy....

2011-12-21 06:26:02

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Severely impaired stroke survivors could walk better when assisted by a robotic system on top of conventional rehabilitation, according to this study. Italian researchers evaluated two-year mobility outcomes in 48 stroke survivors who had been discharged from a hospital and were unable to walk at the study's start. Half underwent conventional overground gait rehabilitation and half had conventional rehab plus electromechanical robotic gait training for several...

2011-12-14 05:00:00

Masters Runner Brian Pilcher Uses New Cross-Training Device to Help Put Together a Career-Best Year in 2011 and Looks Forward to Record-Breaking Marathon Attempt in January Ross, CA (PRWEB) December 14, 2011 2011 was a banner year for Brian Pilcher. After earning three medals at the World Masters Athletics Track and Field Championships, he won the U.S. National Masters Track Championship in both the 5,000 and 10,000-meters for men 55 - 59 and then clocked a record-setting 1:12:52 half...

Flexible Robot Can Change Gait, Travel Over Various Terrain
2011-11-29 06:18:12

[ Watch the Video ] A team of Harvard University scientists have developed a new flexible robot that can crawl, adjust its gait, squeeze under obstacles, and slide its way through tight spaces. According to BBC News Science Editor Paul Rincon, the "soft" robot was inspired by creatures such as the squid and the starfish, and has "several" advantages over more rigid, traditional style machines that have wheels or treads, including a greater array of movement types and less difficulty...


Latest Locomotion Reference Libraries

Microraptor
2012-03-21 23:43:50

Microraptor, meaning “small thief,” is a genus of dromaeosaurid dinosaur from the Early Cretaceous Period (120 million years ago). This small, four-winged animal was first discovered in the Jiufotang Formation in Liaoning, China, with more than two dozen specimens unearthed. There are two known species of Microraptor. The type species, M. zhaoianus, has been hotly debated for years. It was initially placed in the genus Archaeoraptor before a more accurate description placed it in the...

42_be9d0558b2d26ba025fc2ee6fb5b097d
2007-10-24 12:34:20

The Giant Pangolin (Manis gigantea), is a species of pangolin. The Giant Pangolin inhabits Africa with a range stretching along the Equator from West Africa to Uganda. It is found mainly in savanna, rainforest, and forest, where there is a large termite population and available water. It does not inhabit high altitude areas. The Giant Pangolin is the largest species of pangolin (scaly anteaters). It belongs to the Manidae family. It was first described by Johann Karl Wilhelm Illiger in 1815....

40_9775da97b52e0fa8c6cae3cc609b92ad
2005-09-09 07:46:52

The Water strider, (also known as: Skater, Pond Skater, Jesus Bug, Water Skeeter, water scooter, water skater, and Skimmer) is any of a number of predatory insects in the family Gerridae that rely on the surface tension of water to walk on top of it. They live on the surface of ponds, slow streams, marshes, and other quiet waters and can move very quickly (up to 1 m/s) over the surface of water. Aquarius remigis (formerly known as Gerris remigis) is one of the species in Gerridae known as...

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Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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