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Latest London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Stories

2012-05-16 10:11:49

Researchers find alarming prevalence of malaria and sexually transmitted infections among pregnant women and call for urgent trials Clinical trials are urgently needed to test a new treatment that could jointly tackle leading causes of death for babies in sub-Saharan Africa, according to researchers from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. A study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association today suggests that a considerable number of pregnant women...

2012-04-17 13:08:52

A new evaluation by London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine of the physical rehabilitation response after the 2010 Haiti earthquake, finds that many hands didn't always make light work. Thousands of people became disabled during and after the 2010 earthquake, and physical rehabilitation interventions were crucial to the emergency response. The rehabilitation sector alone involved 125 organisations including UN agencies, government, international and Haitian NGOs. With a strong...

2012-03-26 22:25:11

Leading cause of avoidable death - young men who smoke and drink alcohol are most at risk New research has found that treatment of hypertension has failed to improve in the last decade in the countries of the former Soviet Union. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is one of the leading causes of avoidable deaths in the former Soviet Union. The study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, included over 18,400 participants in 2001 and over 17,900 participants...

2012-03-22 10:59:41

Studies in monkeys are unlikely to provide reliable evidence for links between social status and heart disease in humans Studies in monkeys are unlikely to provide reliable evidence for links between social status and heart disease in humans, according to the first ever systematic review of the relevant research. The study, published in PLoS ONE, concludes that although such studies are cited frequently in human health research the evidence is often "cherry picked" and generalisation of...

2012-01-26 02:11:22

Research led by scientists at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has exploited a revolutionary genetic technique to discover how human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) drugs target the parasite which causes the disease. The new knowledge could help lead to the development of better treatments for the tens of thousands of people in sub-Saharan Africa who are affected each year. The findings, published in Nature, are based on the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes and...

2012-01-02 11:52:05

Issue of noncommunicable diseases in post-conflict countries must be addressed Countries recovering from war are at risk of being left to their own devices in tackling non communicable diseases, leaving an "open door" for exploitation by alcohol, tobacco and food companies, health experts warn. Writing in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, Bayard Roberts and Martin McKee, of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and Preeti Patel, of King's College London,...

2011-12-19 11:40:59

The link between malaria and salmonella infections has been explained for the first time, opening the way to more effective treatments. Malaria patients are at high risk of developing fatal bacterial infections, especially salmonella infections. This is commonly believed to be due to generalized immunosuppression by malaria, whereby the entire immune system is weakened and compromised. However, researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine have discovered that the...

2011-12-07 11:28:30

Up to three quarters of elderly people in parts of India have vitamin C deficiency, a study by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine found. Up to three quarters of elderly people in parts of India have vitamin C deficiency, a study by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine found. Vitamin C is an essential nutrient for human health, playing a role from maintenance and repair of tissues to antioxidant activities. This study is the first ever large screening of...

2011-11-09 10:41:58

"Long, dark nights are with us now that the clocks have gone back, but they may be held at bay in future years after new research led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine suggests that moving the clock forward all year round could be good for health.". The study - published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health - found that children were the most physically active on long summer days, with the biggest effect showing between 5pm and 8pm on longer days....


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.