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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 17:20 EDT

Latest Long QT syndrome Stories

2011-02-09 23:30:06

Using skin cells from young patients who have a severe genetic heart defect, Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have generated beating heart cells that carry the same genetic mutation. The newly created human heart cells "” cardiomyocytes "” allowed the researchers for the first time to examine and characterize the disorder at the cellular level. In a study to be published online Feb. 9 in Nature, the investigators also report their identification of a promising...

2011-02-09 13:32:36

Long QT syndrome approximately affects one in every 2,500 people ­-mainly young people. It can cause torsade de pointes episodes, which can trigger sudden death. This study was conducted by researchers of the Hospital Virgen de las Nieves of the University of Granada. The genetic analyses were performed by the laboratory Lorgen in the Health Science Technology Park of Granada Researchers from the Hospital Virgen de las Nieves of the University of Granada have identified the...

2011-02-03 07:30:00

ALISO VIEJO, Calif., Feb. 3, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- AVANIR Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: AVNR) today reported unaudited financial results for the three months ended December 31, 2010. For the first quarter of fiscal 2011, AVANIR reported a net loss of $12.1 million, or $0.11 loss per share, compared with a net loss of $4.8 million, or $0.06 loss per share, for the same period in fiscal 2010. Net revenues consisting primarily of royalty revenue were $1.8 million and $1.5 million for the...

2011-01-28 12:39:39

Australian researchers have come one step closer to understanding how the rhythm of the heartbeat is controlled and why many common drugs, including some antibiotics, antihistamines and anti-psychotics, can cause a potentially fatal abnormal heart rhythm. It is estimated around 40-50% of all drugs in development will block one of the main "Ëœchannels' that carries electricity in the heart and, as a result, can cause heart rhythm problems called cardiac arrhythmias. Most sudden...

2010-11-01 06:00:00

ALISO VIEJO, Calif., Nov. 1, 2010 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- AVANIR Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Nasdaq: AVNR) today announced a management conference call to discuss the approval of NUEDEXTA(TM) (dextromethorphan hydrobromide and quinidine sulfate) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The call is scheduled for today, Monday November 1, 2010 at 5:15 a.m. Pacific time / 8:15 a.m. Eastern time. The live call can be accessed by dialing (877) 558-3407 for domestic callers and (706)...

2010-09-22 10:26:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., Sept. 22 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- AstraZeneca purchased a one-year membership to gain access to an international repository of data designed to aid industry and academic researchers developing new technologies to improve cardiac safety. The database, called the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW), helps researchers better evaluate how drugs affect the heart. Cardiac toxicity is one of the leading causes of removal of drugs from the market today, which is why...

2010-01-07 18:01:53

Scientists have identified a gene underlying a disease that causes temporary paralysis of skeletal muscle. The finding, they say, illustrates how investigations of rare genetic diseases can drive insights into more common ones. The finding is reported in the January 8, 2010 issue of the journal Cell. The disease, known as thyrotoxic hypokalemic periodic paralysis, causes acute attacks of weakness in muscles that control movement. Symptoms range from difficulty grasping objects or rising from...

2009-12-02 19:00:00

Long QT syndrome has been known for decades to trigger sudden fainting spells, dizziness, abnormal heart rhythms and tragically, sudden death. Now researchers from Baylor College of Medicine, in a report that appears in the journal Science Translational Medicine, have linked the most common gene associated with this order with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy as well, giving physicians a tool to identify those most at risk. A potassium channel gene The identification of this particular...

2009-11-15 12:47:26

Targeted postmortem testing to identify genetic mutations associated with sudden unexplained death (SUD) is an effective and less expensive way to determine risk to relatives than comprehensive cardiac testing of first degree relatives, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2009. Postmortem genetic testing can identify mutations that cause cellular dysfunctions leading to heart rhythm disturbances that can cause sudden cardiac death. Such...

2009-11-05 15:21:00

Study has Important Implications for Genetic Testing and Individualized Medicine ROCHESTER, Minn., Nov. 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Results of a long QT syndrome (LQTS) study published in the current issue of Circulation play an important role in understanding genetic testing's role in diagnosing disease, according to the senior author, Michael Ackerman, M.D., Ph.D. A pediatric cardiologist at Mayo Clinic, Dr. Ackerman directs Mayo's Long QT Syndrome Clinic and is the director of the Mayo...