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Latest Long Term Ecological Research Network Stories

miami florida could know as early as 2020 how high sea level will go in the next century
2014-04-15 05:30:37

National Science Foundation City could know as early as 2020 how high sea level will go in the next century Miami could know as early as 2020 how high sea levels will rise into the next century, according to a team of researchers including Florida International University scientist Rene Price. Price is also affiliated with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, one of 25 such NSF LTER sites in ecosystems from...

2013-03-26 19:54:20

Although it´s known that construction of homes in suburban areas can have negative impacts on native plants and animals, a recent study led by University of Massachusetts Amherst ecologist Susannah Lerman suggests that well- managed residential development such as provided by homeowners associations (HOA) can in fact support native wildlife. For their recent study published in Ecology and Society, Lerman and her colleagues Kelly Turner and Christofer Bang of Arizona State University...

2012-12-03 13:48:40

Around the world, the effects of global climate change are increasingly evident and difficult to ignore. However, evaluations of the local effects of climate change are often confounded by natural and human induced factors that overshadow the effects of changes in climate on ecosystems. In the December issue of the journal BioScience, a group of scientists writing on long-term studies of watershed and natural elevation gradients at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire and in...

Story Of Survival For Blown-Down Forests
2012-10-18 11:40:52

To preserve forest health, the best management decision may be to do nothing In newscasts after intense wind and ice storms, damaged trees stand out: snapped limbs, uprooted trunks, entire forests blown nearly flat. In a storm's wake, landowners, municipalities and state agencies are faced with important financial and environmental decisions. A study by Harvard University researchers, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and published in the journal Ecology, yields a...

Reign Of Acid Rain Is Far From Over
2012-07-26 05:46:01

New connection between climate change and acidification of Northeast's forests and streams Acid rain. It was a problem that largely affected U.S. eastern states. It began in the 1950s when Midwest coal plants spewed sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides into the air, turning clouds--and rainfall--acidic. As acid rain fell, it affected everything it touched, leaching calcium from soils and robbing plants of important nutrients. New England's sugar maples were among the trees left high and...

Plant Diversity Key To Maintaining Productive Vegetation
2012-05-04 04:01:35

Long-term study finds that each species plays a role in maintaining a productive ecosystem Vegetation, such as a patch of prairie or a forest stand, is more productive in the long run when more plant species are present, results of a new study show. The long-term study of plant biodiversity found that each species plays a role in maintaining a productive ecosystem, especially when a long time horizon is considered. The research found that every additional species in a plot...

2010 Chile Earthquake Had Surprising Ecological Effects
2012-05-04 03:45:32

Long-forgotten coastal habitats reappeared, species unseen for years returned The reappearance of long-forgotten habitats and the resurgence of species unseen for years may not be among the expected effects of a natural disaster. Yet that's exactly what researchers found in a study of the sandy beaches of south central Chile, after an 8.8-magnitude earthquake and devastating tsunami in 2010. Their study also revealed a preview of the problems wrought by sea level rise--a major...

CU Research Shows Warming Climate Threatens Ecology At Mountain Research Site West Of Boulder
2012-04-19 07:42:15

A series of papers published this month on ecological changes at 26 global research sites -- including one administered by the University of Colorado Boulder in the high mountains west of the city -- indicates that ecosystems dependent on seasonal snow and ice are the most sensitive to changes in climate. The six papers appeared in the April issue of the journal BioScience. The papers were tied to data gathered at sites in North America, Puerto Rico, the island of Moorea near Tahiti, and...

Forests Weaken Under Carbon Strain
2012-04-09 12:27:54

As part of an ongoing study, scientists are now forecasting potential forest carbon loss. Working with the Harvard Forest, Smithsonian Institution and LTER Network, scientists have been closely monitoring carbon levels in Massachusetts for more than 30 years. Based on trends in these forests, the scientists are predicting a carbon loss of up to 18% over the next 50 years. In fact, based on these findings, it would be less harmful to harvest these forests instead. “The rebounding...

Long-Term Study Sheds New Light On Climate Change Impact
2012-04-06 09:03:10

Scientists working on an ongoing study investigating the impact of climate change on various ecosystems have revealed that habitants dependent upon areas that typically experience ice and snow during the winter months are the most threatened by increasing global temperatures. The finding comes after more than three decades worth of study as part of the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network, a National Science Foundation (NSF) initiative that features more than 1800 scientists and...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.