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Latest Long Term Ecological Research Network Stories

How Do Marshes Respond To Sea-level Rise?
2014-09-11 03:16:45

[ Watch The Video: Plum Island Estuary: Studying How Marshes Respond To Sea-Level Rise ] National Science Foundation Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site provides important clues for protecting & managing estuaries At the Plum Island Sound estuary in northeastern Massachusetts, the marsh floods like clockwork. At high tide, you can pass over the mudflats into the grass in a boat. At low tide, the ocean waters recede, leaving behind fresh deposits of nutrient-rich...

stream restoration project in Baltimore
2014-09-10 23:04:46

Urban waters record the salt in our food, cement in our sidewalks, University of Maryland scientist says. (PRWEB) September 10, 2014 Most people think of city landscapes as simpler, diminished versions of the wild forests and free-flowing streams found in remote places. But in a series of studies published Sept. 10, 2014 in a special issue of the journal Biogeochemistry, scientists specializing in urban ecosystems say just the opposite is true. Urban landscapes are more complex than they...

miami florida could know as early as 2020 how high sea level will go in the next century
2014-04-15 05:30:37

National Science Foundation City could know as early as 2020 how high sea level will go in the next century Miami could know as early as 2020 how high sea levels will rise into the next century, according to a team of researchers including Florida International University scientist Rene Price. Price is also affiliated with the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site, one of 25 such NSF LTER sites in ecosystems from...

2013-03-26 19:54:20

Although it´s known that construction of homes in suburban areas can have negative impacts on native plants and animals, a recent study led by University of Massachusetts Amherst ecologist Susannah Lerman suggests that well- managed residential development such as provided by homeowners associations (HOA) can in fact support native wildlife. For their recent study published in Ecology and Society, Lerman and her colleagues Kelly Turner and Christofer Bang of Arizona State University...

2012-12-03 13:48:40

Around the world, the effects of global climate change are increasingly evident and difficult to ignore. However, evaluations of the local effects of climate change are often confounded by natural and human induced factors that overshadow the effects of changes in climate on ecosystems. In the December issue of the journal BioScience, a group of scientists writing on long-term studies of watershed and natural elevation gradients at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire and in...

Story Of Survival For Blown-Down Forests
2012-10-18 11:40:52

To preserve forest health, the best management decision may be to do nothing In newscasts after intense wind and ice storms, damaged trees stand out: snapped limbs, uprooted trunks, entire forests blown nearly flat. In a storm's wake, landowners, municipalities and state agencies are faced with important financial and environmental decisions. A study by Harvard University researchers, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and published in the journal Ecology, yields a...

Reign Of Acid Rain Is Far From Over
2012-07-26 05:46:01

New connection between climate change and acidification of Northeast's forests and streams Acid rain. It was a problem that largely affected U.S. eastern states. It began in the 1950s when Midwest coal plants spewed sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides into the air, turning clouds--and rainfall--acidic. As acid rain fell, it affected everything it touched, leaching calcium from soils and robbing plants of important nutrients. New England's sugar maples were among the trees left high and...

Plant Diversity Key To Maintaining Productive Vegetation
2012-05-04 04:01:35

Long-term study finds that each species plays a role in maintaining a productive ecosystem Vegetation, such as a patch of prairie or a forest stand, is more productive in the long run when more plant species are present, results of a new study show. The long-term study of plant biodiversity found that each species plays a role in maintaining a productive ecosystem, especially when a long time horizon is considered. The research found that every additional species in a plot...

2010 Chile Earthquake Had Surprising Ecological Effects
2012-05-04 03:45:32

Long-forgotten coastal habitats reappeared, species unseen for years returned The reappearance of long-forgotten habitats and the resurgence of species unseen for years may not be among the expected effects of a natural disaster. Yet that's exactly what researchers found in a study of the sandy beaches of south central Chile, after an 8.8-magnitude earthquake and devastating tsunami in 2010. Their study also revealed a preview of the problems wrought by sea level rise--a major...

CU Research Shows Warming Climate Threatens Ecology At Mountain Research Site West Of Boulder
2012-04-19 07:42:15

A series of papers published this month on ecological changes at 26 global research sites -- including one administered by the University of Colorado Boulder in the high mountains west of the city -- indicates that ecosystems dependent on seasonal snow and ice are the most sensitive to changes in climate. The six papers appeared in the April issue of the journal BioScience. The papers were tied to data gathered at sites in North America, Puerto Rico, the island of Moorea near Tahiti, and...


Word of the Day
humgruffin
  • A terrible or repulsive person.
Regarding the etymology of 'humgruffin,' the OED says (rather unhelpfully) that it's a 'made-up word.' We might guess that 'hum' comes from 'humbug' or possibly 'hum' meaning 'a disagreeable smell,' while 'gruffin' could be a combination of 'gruff' and 'griffin.'