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Latest Loop Current Stories

2009-09-29 08:00:22

Cold water cyclones may have strong impact on hurricane intensity and activity Complex interactions between the ocean and overlying atmosphere cause hurricanes to form, and also have a tremendous amount of influence on the path, intensity and duration of a hurricane or tropical weather event. As researchers develop new ways to better understand and predict the nature of individual storms, a largely unstudied phenomenon has caught the attention of scientists at LSU's Earth Scan Laboratory, or...

2009-06-12 14:37:54

LSU's WAVCIS, or Wave-Current-Surge Information System for Coastal Louisiana, has a few new tricks up its sleeve in preparation for the 2009 hurricane season.Drawing from a pool of scientific talent at the university, across the nation and Europe, WAVCIS now offers graphic, easy-to-understand model outputs projecting wave height, current depths and tracks, salinity ratios and water temperature measurements that not only provide state-of-the-art guidance to emergency management officials, but...

2008-09-03 16:59:03

Strong hurricanes are getting stronger, likely thanks to global warming, a new study finds. The news comes as Tropical Storms Hanna, Ike and Josephine march almost in a line across the Atlantic basin, and just days after Hurricane Gustav slammed into the Louisiana coast. Scientists have previously predicted that as global warming further heats up the ocean, hurricanes could become more frequent, more intense or both. The new work is in line with some of those previous studies but...

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2008-08-29 15:47:21

Tropical Storm Gustav appears to be headed for the Gulf of Mexico on the third anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's deadly strike on New Orleans. Experts say Gustav is likely to reach this current late Saturday. If the storm misses it or zips through the current, then Gustav probably won't be much of a name to remember. The Loop Current was a key stopover for nearly all the Gulf Coast killers of the past, including Katrina and Camille, said Florida International University professor Hugh...

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2008-07-01 15:52:16

Hurricanes aren't the only hazards spinning up in the Gulf of Mexico -- they have a liquid counterpart in the waters below called ocean eddies. Offshore industries, such as oil and gas companies, have to keep a weather eye on both. In a worst-case scenario, they could find themselves caught between the two. Satellite altimetry is helping government and industry manage those risks. Satellite ocean observations are a standard part of marine operations around the world. Keeping track of local...

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2008-01-30 21:00:00

When the water in the hurricane breeding grounds of the Atlantic warms one degree in the dead of summer, overall hurricane activity jumps by half, according to a new study. Scientists have long known that hurricanes get their enormous energy from warm waters, so the warmer the water, the more fuel a storm has to either start up or get stronger. The study calculates how much storm frequency and strength is due to warmer sea water, said author Mark Saunders, professor of climate prediction at...

2006-08-15 16:09:48

By Jim Loney MIAMI (Reuters) - Global warming is affecting the intensity of Atlantic hurricanes, according to a new study by a university professor in Florida who says his research provides the first direct link between climate change and storm strength. James Elsner of Florida State University said he set out to perform a statistical analysis of the two theories in a raging debate within the scientific community: Whether recent intense hurricanes are the result of climate change or...

2005-10-03 15:15:00

Scientists monitoring ocean heat and circulation in the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita have a new understanding of how these tropical storms can gain intensity so quickly: The Gulf of Mexico's "Loop Current" is likely intensifying hurricanes that pass over eddies of warm water that spin off the main current. "A positive outcome of a hurricane season like this is that we've been able to learn more about the Loop Current and its associated warm-water eddies, which are...

2005-09-27 01:10:53

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Scientists say it's not easy to tell if global warming caused hurricanes Katrina and Rita but on Monday they forecast more unpredictable weather as Earth gets hotter. Even skeptics agree that global warming is under way and that human activity is at least in part responsible. Climate experts also agree that this warming is likely to make the weather more extreme -- colder in some places, hotter in others, with...

2005-09-15 13:14:01

By Deborah Zabarenko WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The number of strong hurricanes -- like the devastating Katrina -- significantly increased in the last 35 years, fueled by hotter seas that have been linked to global warming, researchers reported on Thursday. Twice as many of the most powerful hurricanes, those ranked Category 4 or 5, have been detected since 1990 as were seen in the period from 1970 to 1985, scientists found in a global survey. But the overall number of hurricanes has...


Latest Loop Current Reference Libraries

Weather Reference Library
2012-07-23 11:11:02

Warm Eddy- is an area of water that is made up of warm water and is surrounded by areas of colder water. The north side of the Gulf Stream is a very popular place to find these types of eddies as they form when the water gets cut off from the main Gulf Stream current and just sits and spins in the colder water until it’s replaced by colder water. Cold Eddy- is an area of water that is made up of colder water and is surrounded by areas of warmer water. The south side of the Gulf Stream is...

The Gulf Stream Ocean Current
2012-07-16 15:25:39

Image Credit: F-5 Weather Data The Gulf Stream is a warm ocean current that travels from the East Coast of Florida all the way northward along the Eastern Seaboard until it gets near North Carolina and Virginia then it starts to make its way back eastward out to sea. The significant impact of this ocean current, as you can see in the image above, is that the waters are warm and this enhances everything from the climate along the East Coast. It will also lead to a milder winter along the...

The Loop Ocean Current
2012-07-10 18:20:32

When it comes to learning about the weather it is very important to understand about the oceans. The reason for this is that ocean currents can play a major role on not only weather but also the climate of a region. The current that we are looking at is called the Loop Current. If you look at the image above you can see that it’s situated just off the west coast of Florida and extends into the Gulf of Mexico. The Loop current is a warm current and this creates a warmer surrounding in...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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