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Latest Lotus effect Stories

Why Do Some Surfaces Repel Water, While Others Attract It?
2013-07-17 05:17:38

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Researchers at MIT are working on better understanding how surfaces attract or repel water. When water strikes a surface, sometimes it spreads evenly while other times it beads into tiny droplets. Studying this behavior can lead to improvements in many applications. If water strikes a material and maximizes its contact with it, then it is known as hydrophilic, but when water is naturally repelled on a material, it is called...

2012-11-27 15:35:35

The wetting model is a classical problem in surface science and biomimetic science. Professor LIU Jianlin and his collaborators from China University of Petroleum, Wuhan University and Fourth Military Medical University approached this old and classical problem from a new direction. They stressed that it is the triple contact line and not the contact area of the droplet/solid interface that determines the macroscopic contact angle. The proposed continuum model, termed the mechanism-based...

2012-07-30 15:44:41

Inspired by the water-repellent properties of the lotus leaf, a group of scientists in China has discovered a way to impart a fog-free, self-cleaning finish to glass and other transparent materials. "Superhydrophobic" surfaces, such as the lotus leaf, are excellent at repelling water and also boast other "smart" self-cleaning, anti-glare, anti-icing, and anti-corrosion properties. By using hollow silica nanoparticles that resemble raspberries, scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences...

2012-06-16 00:47:22

For many years, scientists have been pursuing ways to mimic the perplexing capability of the lotus leaf to repel water. Lotus leaves hate water so much that droplets effortlessly roll off the surface, keeping it clean from dirt. Now an international team of researchers led by Aalto University have come up with an entirely new concept of writing and displaying information on surfaces using simply water. They exploit the unique way a trapped layer of air behaves on a lotus-inspired...

Image 1 - Researchers Take Advice From A Carnivorous Plant
2011-09-22 03:45:05

  Bio-inspired coating resists liquids and could lead to a broad range of advances in fuel transport, anti-bacterial surfaces and more After a rain, the cupped leaf of a pitcher plant becomes a virtually frictionless surface. Sweet-smelling and elegant, the carnivore attracts ants, spiders, and even little frogs. One by one, they slide to their doom. Adopting the plant's slick strategy, a group of applied scientists at Harvard have created a material that repels just about any...


Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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