Quantcast

Latest LSm Stories

2009-10-12 15:06:03

In new papers appearing this month in Science and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, University of Illinois biochemistry professor Raven H. Huang and his colleagues describe the first RNA repair system to be discovered in bacteria. This is only the second RNA repair system discovered to date (with two proteins from T4 phage, a virus that attacks bacteria, as the first). The novelty of the newly discovered bacterial RNA repair system is that, before the damaged RNA is sealed,...

2009-09-17 09:04:29

Further steps toward genetic regulation Discovery by Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers of an additional role for a key molecule in our bodies provides a further step in world-wide efforts to develop genetic regulation aimed at controlling many diseases, including AIDS and various types of cancers. The molecule, known as Lysyl-tRNA synthetase (or LysRS in brief) is one of the most ancient molecules in the cell, where it has long been recognized for its contribution in the translation...

2009-08-23 13:01:35

Study questions current dogma Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine assistant professor in the Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Jeff Coller, Ph.D., and his team discovered that messenger RNA (mRNA) predominately degrade on ribosomes, fundamentally altering a common understanding of how gene expression is controlled within the cell. The study, "Co-translational mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae", is published in the latest issue of Nature. "Many genetic diseases are linked...

2009-08-06 15:04:18

 Rice University physicists have written the next chapter in an innovative approach for studying the forces that shape proteins -- the biochemical workhorses of all living things.New research featured on the cover of today's issue of the Journal of Physical Chemistry illustrates the value of studying proteins with a new method that uses the tools of nanotechnology to grab a single molecule and pull it apart. The new method helps scientists measure the forces that hold proteins together....

1fbf0a277db88230e91074b26b2635a81
2009-07-31 09:45:00

The human eye lens consists of a highly concentrated mix of several proteins. Protective proteins prevent these proteins from aggregating and clumping. If this protective function fails, the lens blurs and the patient develops cataracts. Two research groups at the Department of Chemistry of the Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) have succeeded in explaining the molecular architecture of this kind of protective protein. Their findings, which are published online in the current early...

5258660def903a7f555ee9e20aa9349b1
2009-07-28 09:40:00

Spinal Muscular Atrophy is the second-leading cause of infant mortality in the world.Ravindra Singh, associate professor in biomedical sciences at Iowa State University's College of Veterinary Medicine, would like to see Spinal Muscular Atrophy lose its high ranking and even slide off the list altogether.Most Spinal Muscular Atrophy sufferers -- more than 95 percent -- have a mutated or deleted gene called Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) that doesn't correctly do its job of creating functional...

2009-06-20 09:39:05

Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute, the University of California, San Diego, and Ohio State University have used a very sensitive fluorescence technique to find that a bacterial protein thought to exist in one "natural" three-dimensional structure (shape), can actually twist itself into a second form, depending on the protein's chemical environment. One folded form is active and the other is inactive, but the protein can easily morph from one state to another. The scientists say...

2009-06-15 14:33:39

DNA might be the blueprint for living things, but proteins are the builders. Researchers trying to understand how and which proteins work together have developed a new crosslinking tool that is small and unobtrusive enough to use in live cells. Using the new tool, the scientists have discovered new details about a well-studied complex of proteins known as RNA polymerase. The results suggest the method might uncover collaborations between proteins that are too brief for other techniques to...

2009-06-08 08:30:24

Similar architecture of an essential nuclear pore complex module and cell's vesicle coats supports common evolutionary originThe genome of complex organisms is stashed away inside each cell's nucleus, a little like a sovereign shielded from the threatening world outside. The genome cannot govern from its protective chamber, however, without knowing what's going on in the realm beyond and having the ability to project power there. Guarding access to the nuclear chamber is the job of large,...

2009-06-02 11:46:49

Emotions, popularly seated in the heart, shift with the alternative stimuli of love, hate and emotion.The developing heart requires another kind of shift. The proteins that prompt alternative splicing "“ the mechanism by which one gene can generate a host of proteins "“ must also be dynamic, said a group of researchers including those at Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears in a recent issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Programming...


Word of the Day
bellycheer
  • Good cheer; viands.
  • To revel; to feast.
The word 'bellycheer' may come from 'belle cheer', "good cheer".
Related