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2008-06-24 15:02:18

By JUDY SIEGEL-ITZKOVICH The end of the school year is upon us, and Beterem - the National Center for Child Safety and Health - is worried about accidents among children and teenagers. It and the Health Ministry have launched an information campaign to raise awareness among parents and children, as the summer months invariably mean a rise in injury and deaths in this age group from road accidents, choking, poisoning, falls, drownings and other incidents. In 2007, a total of 121...

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2008-04-15 09:40:00

Genetic study finds chance helps determine fate of B. subtilis bacteriaAn investigation of the genes that govern spore formation in the bacteria B. subtilis shows that chance plays a significant role in determining which of the microbes sacrifice themselves for the colony and which go on to form spores.B. subtilis, a common soil bacteria, is a well-known survivor. When running short of food, it can alternatively band together in colonies or encase itself in a tough, protective spore to wait...

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2008-03-26 11:30:00

Scientists have discovered two key proteins that guide one of the two groups of pathogenic bacteria to make their hardy outer shells -- their defense against the world.The work, they said, could allow researchers to create new antibiotics against gram-negative bacteria, like E. coli and salmonella that would destroy these bacteria by disabling the mechanism that produces their protective coating."A long-term goal is to find inhibitors of these proteins we have discovered," said Natividad...

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2008-01-09 08:10:00

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - The crystal structure of a molecule from a primitive fungus has served as a time machine to show researchers more about the evolution of life from the simple to the complex. By studying the three-dimensional version of the fungus protein bound to an RNA molecule, scientists from Purdue University and the University of Texas at Austin have been able to visualize how life progressed from an early self-replicating molecule that also performed chemical reactions to one in...

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2008-01-07 06:10:00

For the first time, scientists have captured detailed images of life's essence. The dazzling pictures reveal a key step in the process of cell division, which all organisms must undergo to survive. The moment occurs deep within a cell, as two proteins work in concert to unzip a strand of DNA to create two new cells. But until now, scientists seeking to directly observe this essential process only could view fuzzy images taken by an electron microscope. A scientist at the University of...

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2007-03-20 08:20:00

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz, have determined the three-dimensional structure of an RNA enzyme, or "ribozyme," that carries out a fundamental reaction required to make new RNA molecules. Their results provide insight into what may have been the first self-replicating molecule to arise billions of years ago on the evolutionary path toward the emergence of life. In all forms of life known today, the synthesis of DNA and RNA molecules is carried out by enzymes made of...

2005-11-03 14:20:40

A new, sharper picture of the nano-machine that translates our genetic program into proteins promises to help researchers explain how some types of antibiotics work and could lead to the design of better ones. The high-resolution snapshots of the bacterial ribosome were captured by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) with the lab's Advanced Light Source, which generates intense beams of X-rays that can reveal unprecedented...

2005-10-20 14:19:18

PHILADELPHIA "“ The discovery in 1977 that the coding regions of a gene could appear in separate segments along the DNA won the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for Richard J. Roberts and Phillip A. Sharp. The active segments of a gene were termed exons, separated from each other within the gene by inactive introns. The research suggested the necessary existence of a number of biological processes and active entities, many of which have since been tracked down by other...

2005-10-13 04:46:57

CHAPEL HILL -- Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have identified an elusive protein that performs a necessary step in the production of human chromosomes. The new study appears in the most recent issue (Oct. 7) of the journal Cell. The study found that a protein called CPSF73 acts like scissors to cut strands of histone messenger RNA (mRNA) in the cell nucleus. This cutting action produces the mRNA needed to create histone proteins that combine...

2005-09-21 20:46:23

DALLAS - Sept. 21, 2005 - By examining how proteins have evolved, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have discovered a set of simple "rules" that nature appears to use to design proteins, rules the scientists have now employed to create artificial proteins that look and function just like their natural counterparts. In two papers appearing in the Sept. 22 issue of the journal Nature, Dr. Rama Ranganathan, associate professor of pharmacology, and his colleagues detail a new method for...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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