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Latest LSm Stories

2011-04-20 15:05:19

Intracellular transport mechanism dissected In a multicellular organism, different cells fulfill a range of diversified functions. Often such specialization depends on the delivery of molecular goods to distinct places within a cell. It ensures that particular functions only occur at defined cellular sites. This establishment of intracellular asymmetry in the otherwise fluid environment of the cell cytoplasm requires active transport processes. Messenger RNAs (mRNA) represent an especially...

2011-04-18 17:37:56

Amish population in Ohio has large numbers of MOPD1 Researchers have identified a genetic mutation found in the Ohio Amish population as the cause of a fatal developmental disease in fetuses and infants, according to research published in the April 8, 2011, issue of Science. The genetic mutation is caused by a defect during the cellular protein-making process, causing microcephalic osteodysplastic primoridal dwarfism type 1 (MOPD1), a rare developmental disorder that greatly slows fetal...

2011-04-07 22:12:14

Fetuses with defects in a molecular machine that edits information cells use to make proteins can develop a rare form of dwarfism, according to a new study led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center "“ Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC "“ James). The defect, triggered by a tiny gene mutation, causes microcephalic osteodysplastic primoridal dwarfism type 1 (MOPD1), a rare developmental disorder that...

2011-03-21 15:19:00

FRAZER, Pa., March 21, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Cephalon, Inc. (Nasdaq: CEPH) announced today that it has signed a definitive merger agreement under which it will acquire all of the outstanding capital stock of Gemin X Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a privately-held biopharmaceutical company developing first-in-class cancer therapeutics, for $225 million cash on a cash-free, debt-free basis. Gemin X stockholders could also receive up to $300 million in cash payments upon the achievement of certain...

2011-03-15 20:51:32

When vital proteins in our bodies are misfolded, debilitating diseases can result. If researchers could see the folding happen, they might be able to design treatments for some of these diseases or even keep them from occurring. But many of our most critical proteins are folded, hidden from sight, inside tiny molecular chambers. Now researchers at Stanford have gotten the first-ever peek inside one of these protein-folding chambers as the folding happened, and the folding mechanism they saw...

2011-03-10 23:36:25

Lasers used to study splicing of pre-messenger RNA molecules From neurosurgery to bar code readers, lasers have been used in a myriad of applications since they were first introduced in the late 1950's. Now, with the work being done in Jeff Gelles' Lab at Brandeis University, researchers have developed a way to use lasers to study the splicing of pre-messenger RNA molecules, an essential process in creating proteins to sustain advanced organisms, including human life. This process of splicing...

2011-03-08 19:37:54

OSU's Lamb leverages supercomputer to study protein's evolution An Ohio State University molecular biologist leveraged a supercomputer to help better define the family tree of a group of enzymes that have been implicated in a wide range of human diseases and are important targets for anti-cancer therapies. Along with several OSU colleagues, Rebecca S. Lamb, Ph.D., an assistant professor of Molecular Genetics, recently analyzed the evolutionary history of the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP)...

2011-02-09 23:47:18

Study finds long-known, but little-understood DNA elements serve important purpose Scientists have discovered a new way genes are regulated that is unique to primates, including humans and monkeys. Though the human genome "“ all the genes that an individual possesses "“ was sequenced 10 years ago, greater understanding of how genes function and are regulated is needed to make advances in medicine, including changing the way we diagnose, treat and prevent a wide range of diseases....

2011-01-20 16:47:53

For years, RNA has seemed an elusive tool in nanotechnology research"”easily manipulated into a variety of structures, yet susceptible to quick destruction when confronted with a commonly found enzyme. "The enzyme RNase cuts RNA randomly into small pieces, very efficiently and within minutes," explains Peixuan Guo, PhD, Dane and Mary Louise Miller Endowed Chair and professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Cincinnati (UC). "Moreover, RNase is present everywhere, making...

2011-01-19 23:20:54

Scientists are reporting an advance in overcoming a major barrier to the use of the genetic material RNA in nanotechnology "” the field that involves building machines thousands of times smaller than the width of a human hair and now is dominated by its cousin, DNA. Their findings, which could speed the use of RNA nanotechnology for treating disease, appear in the monthly journal ACS Nano. Peixuan Guo and colleagues point out that DNA, the double-stranded genetic blueprint of life, and...