Quantcast

Latest Ludwig Institute Stories

2005-07-24 18:44:47

(Melbourne, July 24) -- It started several years ago with the observation that a large group of seemingly unconnected genes were behaving differently in patients with stomach cancer. Now a multi-national research team led by the Melbourne Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) has joined the proverbial dots and identified a potential new target for stomach cancer therapy, according to a paper published today in the prestigious Nature Medicine journal. The paper's first...

2005-06-29 19:39:54

(San Diego, June 29th) -- Investigators from the University California, San Diego (UCSD) Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) and NimbleGen Systems have developed an efficient method to identify thousands of regulatory sequences in the human genome, according to a study published today in Nature. Genes are defined by their ability to generate a functional product. Thus the 'promoter' - a DNA sequence that controls when and where a gene product is generated - is the...

2005-06-07 18:43:45

(Uppsala, June 7th) - A team of investigators from the Uppsala Branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (LICR) and Harvard Medical School has uncovered novel targets for the development of drugs that would potentially complement, or replace, statins in treating heart disease. Statins are commonly taken drugs that reduce the levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL) and have been shown to reduce risks associated with heart disease, the number one killer in the Western world. However,...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
Related