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Latest Lunar science Stories

Copernicus crater
2013-04-03 04:40:58

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Large impacts on the Moon produce unimaginable amounts of energy; however, they may not wipe the mineralogical slate clean. New research, led by Brown University geoscientists, has discovered a rock body with a distinct mineralogy snaking 18 miles across the floor of Copernicus crater — a 60-mile-wide feature on the Moon's near side. Mineralogical signatures of rock present before the impact that created the crater appear to...

Solar Wind Helps Lunar Dust Leap Around The Surface
2013-03-18 14:36:54

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online NASA scientists describe using new calculations just how odd the surface of the moon really is, saying dust on the moon can actually leap from the dark side to the light side. Even though the moon has no atmosphere, solar wind from the sun actually generates some unseen commotion on the surface of our neighboring satellite. Solar wind is a stream of electrically conducting gas known as plasma shot off the surface of the sun at...

Seas Of Molten Rock Created By Lunar Impacts
2013-03-12 04:54:36

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online An ocean of molten rock covered the entire lunar surface during the early part of the Moon's history. Over millions of years, that magma ocean cooled, differentiating to form the crust and mantle. According to new analysis of NASA's Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) data, led by Brown University planetary scientists, this wasn't the last time the Moon's surface melted on such a massive scale. Graduate student William Vaughan led...

2013-03-05 23:03:29

Flexure Engineering has invited specialists from around the world in fields of cold temperature electronics, DeepCrypo Engineering, Lunar science, and space entrepreneurship to take part in the Third Annual International Lunar Superconductor Applications Workshop (LSA 3). SEATTLE, WA (PRWEB) March 05, 2013 Russell Cox, Director of Research at Flexure Engineering, announced today that, “We´re excited to host our third LSA workshop http://www.lsa2013.com/ in Florida to foster the...

Traces Of Water Found In Apollo 15 Lunar Sample
2013-02-18 14:39:05

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online University of Michigan scientists have found traces of water from a lunar sample brought back during the Apollo 15 mission. The lunar sample, known as "Genesis Rock," was thought to be a piece of the moon's primordial crust, and researchers writing in Nature Geoscience are now reporting they have found traces of water in the rock. The traces of water were detected within the crystalline structure of mineral samples taken from...

2013-02-06 09:43:42

Revising and revisiting the Giant Impact Theory Scientists are revisiting the age-old question of how Earth's moon formed with the development of two new models that work out the complicated physics of planetary collisions. The idea of a moon-forming collision is not new: The Giant Impact Theory put forth in the 1970s suggested that the moon resulted from a collision with a protoplanet approximately half the size of ancient Earth. But the physics underlying such a collision implied that...

Using 3D Printing Technology To Build A Lunar Base
2013-02-01 15:16:12

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online Three-dimensional printing is growing rampantly and the European Space Agency (ESA) has decided to utilize the up-and-coming technology to build a base on the moon using lunar soil. ESA is partnering with industrial partners, including architects Foster + Partners, to see if the idea of building a lunar habitat on the moon is a feasible one. Foster + Partners created a dome with a cellular structured wall that could help to...

Disney Name Goes Interplanetary With Impact Crater Identity
2012-12-21 13:55:02

Lee Rannals for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Mercury has gained a little more fame in the eyes of Hollywood, after the International Astronomical Union (IAU) agreed to name nine impact craters after Walt Disney. The MESSENGER Science Team proposed nine names for impact craters on Mercury, all of which refer to either a blues singer, animation pioneer Walter Elias "Walt" Disney, or other artists. IAU has been the gatekeeper for planetary and satellite nomenclature since 1919,...

Minnesota’s Apollo 11 Moon Rocks Found In National Guard Storage Unit
2012-11-27 08:17:26

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Hundreds of moon rocks that have been handed out to state governments and foreign countries through the years have gone missing, according to a NASA audit last December. Though some have been recovered, most are still missing. On a good note, another set of lunar pebbles were found this week in a government storage area in St. Paul, Minnesota. The rocks were part of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission on July 20, 1969 in which...

Mercury Has Unusual Tectonic Landforms
2012-11-16 09:30:37

[ Watch the Video: What Is Mercury ] April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online MESSENGER, in orbit around Mercury since March of last year, has discovered assemblages of tectonic landforms unlike any previously found on Mercury or elsewhere in the Solar System. Smithsonian scientist Thomas Watters published the findings in the December issue of Geology. Mercury's surface is covered with deformational landforms, formed by faulting in response to horizontal contraction or...


Latest Lunar science Reference Libraries

Volcano_q
2012-06-26 19:51:17

The Hadean is the unofficial geological period of time that lies just before the Archean time period. The Hadean began with the formation of the Earth roughly 4.5 billion years ago (Ga) and ended about 3.8 Ga; the latter date varies according to different sources. Hadean is derived from Hades, Greek for “underworld,” referring to the hellish conditions on the planet at the time. The term was coined in 1972 by geologist Preston Cloud. The period was later classified as the “Priscoan...

6_d482c2be3fde61d7b1ea392b972acdb62
2004-10-19 04:45:41

Crater -- A crater is a circular depression on the surface of a planet, moon, asteroid, or other celestial body. Craters are typically caused by meteorite impacts, although some are caused by volcanic activity. In the center of craters on Earth a crater lake often accumulates, and in craters formed by meteorites a central island (caused by rebounding crustal rock after the impact) is usually a prominent feature in the lake. Ancient craters whose relief has disappeared leaving only a...

4_e0f932ed4e92d817020bb78521ddbe5c2
2004-10-19 04:45:41

The Moon -- The Moon is the largest satellite of the Earth, and is occasionally called Luna (Latin for moon) to distinguish it from the general use of the word "moon". The Moon is distinguished from the satellites of other planets by its initial capital letter; the other moons are described in the natural satellite article. The words moon and month come from the same Old English root word. The Moon makes a complete orbit of the celestial sphere about every four weeks. Each hour the...

4_ed21346130ba11f9f87c7ff86be090482
2004-10-19 04:45:40

The Moon -- natural satellite of a planet, in particular, the single natural satellite of the earth. The Earth-Moon System The moon is the earth's nearest neighbor in space. In addition to its proximity, the moon is also exceptional in that it is quite massive compared to the earth itself, the ratio of their masses being far larger than the similar ratios of other natural satellites to the planets they orbit (with the exception of Charon and Pluto). For this reason, the...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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