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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 15:58 EDT

Latest Lund University Stories

2014-04-04 12:35:32

Using magnetically controlled nanoparticles to force tumor cells to 'self-destruct' sounds like science fiction, but could be a future part of cancer treatment, according to research from Lund University in Sweden. "The clever thing about the technique is that we can target selected cells without harming surrounding tissue. There are many ways to kill cells, but this method is contained and remote-controlled", said Professor Erik Renström. The point of the new technique is that it is...

fern fossil
2014-03-24 07:26:02

Lund University Researchers from Lund University and the Swedish Museum of Natural History have made a unique discovery in a well-preserved fern that lived 180 million years ago. Both undestroyed cell nuclei and individual chromosomes have been found in the plant fossil, thanks to its sudden burial in a volcanic eruption. The well-preserved fossil of a fern from the southern Swedish county of Skåne is now attracting attention in the research community. The plant lived around 180...

Lingonberries Halt Effects Of A High-Fat Diet
2014-01-23 12:20:55

Lund University Lingonberries almost completely prevented weight gain in mice fed a high-fat diet, a study at Lund University in Sweden has found - whereas the ‘super berry’ açai led to increased weight gain. The Scandinavian berries also produced lower blood sugar levels and cholesterol. The Lund University research team used a type of mouse that easily stores fat and therefore can be regarded as a model for humans who are overweight and at risk of diabetes. Some of the mice...

2013-10-02 12:54:14

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have for the first time managed to measure the internal pressure that enables the herpes virus to infect cells in the human body. The discovery paves the way for the development of new medicines to combat viral infections. The results indicate good chances to stop herpes infections in the future. A virus comprises a thin shell of protein, within which are its genes. A long-standing theory has been that a virus has high internal pressure because it...

2013-08-28 10:46:43

Fifteen years ago, a hematologist came to Dianna Milewicz, M.D., Ph.D., with a puzzle: Multiple generations of an East Texas family suffered from a moderately severe bleeding disorder, but it wasn’t hemophilia. “No surgeon would do elective surgery because they bled too much after surgery,” said Milewicz, professor and director of the Division of Medical Genetics at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). “So we collected DNA and plasma from the family...

2013-07-29 16:37:29

After a breast cancer operation, the removed tumor is always examined, as its subtype can provide an indication of how aggressive the disease is. The patient's lymph nodes are not analyzed in the same way. Yet the breast tumor can sometimes appear to be of a less aggressive type while the subtype in the lymph nodes gives a different and more worrying picture. In these cases, it is the lymph nodes that provide the correct prognosis, according to new research at Lund University in Sweden. An...

2013-06-18 13:20:33

People born during whooping cough outbreaks are more likely to die prematurely even if they survive into adulthood, research at Lund University in Sweden has found. Women had a 20% higher risk of an early death, and men a staggering 40%. Women also suffered more complications during and after pregnancy, with an increased risk of miscarriage as well as infant death within the first month of life. "The results show the importance of following up patients with exposure to whooping cough in...

2013-06-05 13:17:04

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered how to stop the destructive process that leads to cardiovascular disease in diabetic laboratory animals. It is well known that high blood sugar levels significantly raise the risk of cardiovascular disease. It is unclear, however, why this happens. An important part of the explanation may be NFAT, a protein activated when blood sugar is raised and which starts a chain of events that damage the blood vessels and accelerate the...

2013-05-21 08:34:16

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have mapped the significance of heredity for common forms of atherosclerotic disease. No studies have previously examined whether different forms of the disease share heredity. The study looked at coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, peripheral arterial disease and atherosclerosis of the aorta in individuals whose siblings and parents have suffered different types of cardiovascular disease. The results showed that heredity is highest for...

2013-04-25 19:46:09

Drinking coffee could decrease the risk of breast cancer recurring in patients taking the widely used drug Tamoxifen, a study at Lund University in Sweden has found. Patients who took the pill, along with two or more cups of coffee daily, reported less than half the rate of cancer recurrence, compared with their non-coffee drinking, Tamoxifen-taking counterparts. The team followed over 600 breast cancer patients from southern Sweden for an average of five years. Approximately 300 took...